Strawberry blue

"Strawberry Blue" found its roots in the aftermath of my migration to a country of the European North. For six years, I spent most of my evenings in this park, observing its nuances and interacting with people strikingly dissimilar to me.

"Strawberry Blue" found its roots in the aftermath of my migration to a country of the European North, where I left behind the comforting embrace of family, friends, memories, and routines. 

Things got off to a bad start; a few broken bones and a baby never born. The upheaval of adapting to this new environment triggered an inner quest for belonging and identity redefinition.

The images take shape in a park south of my new home —a space that gradually dissipated my subtle blue mood. This is a landscape in which, for six years, I found solace by observing its nuances. Being attracted by people strikingly dissimilar to those I usually encounter, I realized that the feeling of not fitting in was binding us together. Their names faded into the background, replaced by my own invented nicknames inspired by their stories, scars, tattoos, and resemblances to others. Elvis, Whitey White, Rat-Attacked, and Suntana made this place vulnerable, thus more true.

"Strawberry Blue" stands as a testament to the universal human experience in a foreign landscape. Drawing inspiration from Bergman's symbolic use of strawberries, it invites reflection into the transient nature of time and memory, emphasizing the importance of cherishing the moments that bring sweetness to our lives.


Within the realm of "Strawberry Blue," I cultivate an imaginary universe—a space where I feel I can grow roots again.