Published on 21st February 2019

Rest Behind Curtain

  • Two Kyrgyz women getting a sterilisation lamp treatment at Aurora Sanatorium in Kyrgyzstan. This procedure is being used for treating bronchitis and tuberculosis.

  • Zlata, Ukrainian girl in a dress created for a beauty contest. Odessa, Ukraine.

  • Over 90 year old patient prepares to lie down after a session in the steam room. The steam used contains healing radioactive radon. Khoja Obi Garm sanatorium, Tajikistan.

  • Plastic flamingos on the Primorskoye Beach in Odessa, Ukraine.

  • Women gazing at the sea. Mishor, Crimea, Ukraine.

  • Boton and Dolly on the stage of run down open-air theatre in Club Aliga. Club Aliga used to be a summer resort center, exclusive only to high-ranked Hungarian communistic party members as well as Castro, Honecker and Brezhniev among others. Now the center is open to the public. Lake Balaton, Hungary.

  • Masha the cleaner at Mishor Sanatorium. Crimea, Ukraine.

  • Dima, a doctor waiting for the patient. Every stay at the sanatorium starts with doctors examination to determine what treatment is needed. Foros, Ukraine.

  • The lounge of Foros Sanatorium in Crimea. Crimea is a home to the most splendid sanatoriums in the former Soviet Union.

  • Aurora Sanatorium. A Kyrgyz wrestler about to take a swim in the pool before visiting the on-site gym for a work-out. The ship-shaped, brutalist Aurora was in the past exclusively open for the communist party elite. It is located at the shore of lake Issyk Kul in Kyrgyzstan - second biggest alpine lake in the world.

  • Tunda, a hungarian tourist, sunbathing on the waterfront in Siofok. Siofok is a most popular summer destination, famous for its beaches and nightlife. Hungarians often call it ‘the capitol of Balaton', as it is the largest on its shore and acts as the commercial and tourism hub of the region.

  • Electrotherapy is used to treat sinusitis and other nasal inflammations. Mishor Sanatorium in Crimea, Ukraine.

  • The beach in front of Pobeda Health Resort in Evpatoria. Evpatoria is a major Black Sea resort town. Natural factors create excellent conditions for the treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis and other children's diseases. Crimea, Ukraine.

  • A woman taking a mineral water bath, which is a staple at most sanatoriums. It is claimed to help a variety of conditions, including rheumatological and musculoskeletal diseases. Aurora sanatorium, Kyrgyzstan.

  • Monkey in the auditorium before circus troupe performance at Foros Sanatorium in Crimea. Many hotels and sanatoria would feature performance hall and auditorium so after a day spent on a beach or in a spa guests would get entertained. The auditoria would vary from glamorous concert halls to small, intimate outdoor theatres.

  • Tskaltubo in Georgia was one of the most desirable towns in so-called Russian Riviera. A subtropical landscape town on the eastern shore of Black Sea was home to over twenty magnificent sanatoria. In early nineties many thousands Georgians who escaped the war in nearby Abhazia had come here to make these buildings their homes. Today almost all the buildings are in the state of decay - some still occupied by refugees.

  • Austrian twin sisters. Austrians, Germans and tourists from Eastern European nations have been flooding hungarian summer resorts by the Lake Balaton for decades. Siofok, Hungary.

  • Man waiting for his meal on the hill overlooking a beautiful valley where Khoja Obi Garm Sanatorium is built - a hulking brutalist building nestled high in the Gissar mountain range. The mountain on which the sanatorium is built is called by the locals a Magic Mountain, where radon water flows from several underground sources. Tajikistan.

  • Women having a herbal tea after visit to the sauna. The steam used contains healing radioactive radon. Khoja Obi Garm sanatorium, Tajikistan.

  • Tskaltubo was one of the most desirable towns in so-called Russian Riviera. A subtropical landscape town on the eastern shore of Black Sea was home to over twenty magnificent sanatoria. In early nineties many thousands Georgians who escaped the war in nearby Abhazia had come here to make these buildings their homes. Today almost all the buildings are in the state of decay - some still occupied by refugees. Tskaltubo, Georgia.

Rest Behind Curtain


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  • portrait
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  • holidays
  • soviet union
  • eastern europe