»There is glory in prevention«

Patrick Junker

2020 - Ongoing

Although the number of people in need of care in Germany's aging society continues to rise, and almost one in two die in hospital, it took a pandemic to make society realize how systemically relevant nursing professions really are. People in home offices applauded from balconies, and politicians sang the praises of the "everyday heroes." In the summer, the nursing situation was just one of many topics on the political agenda. It seemed as if everything had not been so bad. But the state of nursing has long been in a permanent crisis. To contain the Covid 19 pandemic, fundamental rights such as freedom of the person, freedom of assembly or inviolability of the home, and the right to physical integrity were restricted. Using so-called lockdowns, it was possible to reduce the incidence of infection in Germany and avoid overloading the health system.

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  • Germany, Stuttgart, May 23, 2020: Dr. Verena Werling takes a break during a mass test for covid-19 in a senior center. She is waiting for the nursing director to enter the area for seniors with dementia. Doctor Verena Werling spent three months driving around Stuttgart with a mobile testing station, testing suspected cases in private homes, and testing residents of retirement and nursing homes.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, 08 May 2020: For weeks now, Katerina D. and Mirka D. have been standing in front of Marienhospital every day, looking at the room window of their father and husband Wenzel D. On this day, Wenzel D. is fit enough to look back for the first time - sitting on a chair with the help of the nursing staff. Wenzel D. is in the intensive care unit with covid-19. He was admitted on March 21 and intubated directly. After 31 days in an induced coma, he was able to slowly come awake.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, April 28, 2020: The senior physician of the Internal Intensive Care Unit, Michael Heinold, MD, touches the hand of patient Wenzel D. .Mr. D. is still being ventilated on his neck. He cannot yet speak and responds only slightly to Dr. Heinold's questions. He is stimulated with pictures of his wife and daughter and tested to see if the brain has taken damage. Wenzel Demel, 68, is severely ill with COVID-19 and was in an induced coma for a total of 31 days.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, 08 May 2020: Covid-19 ward 9ab was converted back to a normal ward today. However, staff from another ward at Marienhospital tested positive for Covid-19. This station has to be closed. All 20 patients will be transferred to the ward 9ab that day. To contain the Covid 19 pandemic, fundamental rights such as freedom of the person, freedom of assembly or inviolability of the home, and the right to physical integrity were restricted. Using so-called lockdowns, it was possible to reduce the incidence of infection in Germany and avoid overloading the health system.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, 22 April 2020: Physiotherapist Nadja Beer wipes her shield with surface disinfectant. Nadja Beer has just completed her training as a physical therapist. She volunteered to serve on the Covid-19 ward.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, Marienhospital, April 17, 2020: A nurse is waiting to be tested for Covid-19.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, 11 October 2020: Wenzel D. goes for a walk in Stuttgart. With him: his portable oxygen device and a pulse oximeter, with which he measures his blood's oxygen saturation. At the same time, the number of people infected with Corona rises sharply again. Since the previous day, Stuttgart has been considered a risk area. Wenzel D. is one of the first patients in Germany to survive a severe Covid-19 course. Today, he still requires a mobile oxygen device.

  • Germany, Stuttgart, 22 June 2020: Back to everyday life. Nurse Laura Reppekus is responsible for 23 patients on the night shift alone. When Ward 9ab still cared for COVID-19 patients, the night shift was staffed with at least two registered nurses.


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