Closed - PhMuseum

Series "Closed"




Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

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  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.

  • Series "Closed"

    


Public space, private space, exposed, hidden, informal economy, protection, limit, covered, uncovered.



    I am interested in the conversion of public space to private space, the ways in which people appropriate space and make it their own, covering it, protecting it, closing it, tacitly stating that space no longer belongs to others, but has now become the (temporary) property of who set its canvas there defining their space.



    Since a couple of years I have been interested in the register of the public spaces ownership and its conversion into private or semi-private spaces; for me, street stalls have two reading levels, on one side they are almost as a kind of involuntary installation, with its folds, knots, bends, which speak of the thousands of times that they fold, open and closed over the days, months and years; and on the other hand, these talk of a Mexico filled with contrasts and inequalities, a Mexico that lives in the street as an extension of private space.



    The street trade is a manifestation of the growing informal economy, fixed stalls or, as in the case of the series of stalls, which by their materials, can not be considered fixed (although some have been in the same place for years) or formally established. With formally I mean paying electricity, water and taxes (the owners of the space pay for their services, as well as for the space itself, in an informally way, either on the basis of bribes, or directly through extortion).

    And so, such spaces are shaping the landscape in sidewalks, subway exits, parks, and the street itself becomes a shop, a restaurant, sometimes even a room or a house.

These spaces make me wonder: what's behind these plastics? How do people occupy these spaces when they "close" them? Where does private begins? How do I define what I consider my property? Furthermore, they generate thoughts about the economic inequalities they represent and the public space as an ideology and a mental place in the imaginary of people.


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