Nobody Listened

  • Michelle Burns, thirty, sits with her ten-year-old niece, Dannataya, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Monica Lee, Dannataya’s mother and Michelle’s twin sister, was murdered in January 2015 by a thirty-eight-year-old white male she had met that night. He received a thirteen-year sentence. “I feel lonesome a lot,” Michelle says. “I have to remember that [Dannataya] is watching me. When I walk, I try to walk with good intentions, so that when she’s older she won’t end up lost. Her mom would want good things for her.”

  • The North Saskatchewan River, located just outside of Prince Albert, where Beatrice Adam’s body was found on October 12, 2014. Her death remains unresolved. Beatrice disappeared along with her boyfriend, who has not been seen since. “She’s gone now,” said Beatrice’s father, Allan Adam. “We just want to know how she died.”

  • From left to right: Marcia Bird, 19; Margaret Bird, 20; Aleisha Charles, 21; and Ariel Charles, 17, of La Ronge, pictured in Prince Albert, while searching for their mother. Some of the daughters had vivid dreams about where their mother might be, and with little police support, instigated a search on their own. In November, the police finally helped organize a search in which around 15 family and community members spent the weekend looking around an area six miles or so north of Prince Albert.

  • Aleisha Charles, 21, shows a tattoo dedicated to her mother, Happy Charles, whose name in Cree, “Kokuminahkisis,” means “black widow.” Aleisha and her three other sisters traveled to Prince Albert from La Ronge, more than 100 miles, to search for their mother, who went missing at the beginning of April 2017. Though their mother is addicted to intravenous drugs and has been in and out of rehab since she was a teenager, she has never been missing for this long, according to Regina Poitras, Happy’s mother. Happy Charles remains missing to this day.

  • Tracey George Heese, 42, sits in a tepee on buffalo skin, a symbol that reminds her of her late mother, Winnifred George. Winnifred was murdered and discovered next to a park bench in Edmonton, Alberta, more than 20 years ago. Tracey still has no answers. “This buffalo skin represents Canada, this North America. This was [our ancestor’s] land. I think of all the buffalo that were slaughtered [here]… Are aboriginal women to be sacrificed as the buffalo have?” said Tracey. “Not enough is being done. The Canadian system is derailing us… growing up and hearing of these deaths of our aboriginal women, it doesn’t matter if we’re educated. All you have to say is she’s aboriginal, and people have that stereotype.”

  • Tanya Sayer, 38, estimates she has known ten indigenous women who have gone missing or been murdered, including some of serial killer Robert Pickton’s victims. “I’ve been raped, left on the outskirts of town, held hostage, been involved in gangs,” said Tanya, who says she was sucked into prostitution in her late teens. “The solution is only through the Creator, you have to want your life back,” she said. “There’s a spiritual sickness that comes from residential schools. It’s this transgenerational trauma… When you sober up, it’s just too painful… [The pain] never goes away. You just have to walk with it.” In many cases, women who have been victims of murder or abuse are in vulnerable life circumstances like Tanya. According to Troy Cooper, who was the police chief of Prince Albert for 13 years until moving to Saskatoon this January, “people take comfort in the idea that [murdered victims are] from a high-risk lifestyle, but sex workers are actually victims.”

  • Wood burns in preparation for a sweat lodge on the outskirts of Regina. Many women facing the loss of a loved one have turned to sweat, ceremony, and traditional teachings. “The healing started from that first sweat. I sweat for four days,” said Gwenda Yuzicappi, whose daughter was found dead on Little Black Bear First Nation on May 5, 2008. “I still need all those ceremonies."

  • Mary Tremblay, 33, finds solitude in La Ronge. Mary’s sister, Julie Houghton, was found dead in a ditch along the highway between Quinton and Raymore in 2005. Her death remains unsolved. “I would like to find the man who killed my sister,” Mary said. Thirty-five cases of missing and murdered indigenous women remain unsolved in Saskatchewan, but actual numbers are likely to be much higher.

  • Linda Roberts, 36, remembers her daughter, Jadene Irving, during happier days outside of their home in La Ronge. Jadene committed suicide in her room in October 2016, at the age of 14. Jadene’s best friend and classmate took her life a few weeks after. In the same month, six young girls committed suicide. According to the Canadian Broadcast Corporation, First Nations’ youth lack hope. Self-esteem issues common at that age are compounded by poverty, inequality felt within communities, and lack of resources. Kids Help Phone, a charity organization that counsels children on the phone and online, concluded that 22 percent of Canadian teens considered suicide in 2016, and according to the Centre for Suicide prevention, indigenous youth were five to six times more likely to commit suicide than non-indigenous youth.

  • The sun rises over the Valley of Fort Qu’Appelle. The Cree and the Saulteaux First Nations were once nomadic in these lands in search of buffalo. It was here, in 1874, where their rights and privileges to 75,000 square miles of land would be signed over to the Queen under Treaty 4.

Nobody Listened

Portrait, Social Issues, Documentary
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Goforth\u2019s family believes he may have murdered others. \r<\/p><p>Goforth\u2019s death is not an isolated incident in Saskatchewan, one of many areas in North America struggling with a shameful record of abuse, neglect, and indifference toward its Indigenous women and populations. \r<\/p><p>Indigenous communities in North American experience high levels of poverty and are plagued by addiction, family breakdown, and some of the highest suicide rates in the world. Women and girls, though, continue to face the brunt of a systemic racism prevalent throughout the region: the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) estimated that between 1980 and 2012, around 1,200 Indigenous women were murdered or went missing. The Native Women\u2019s Association of Canada argues that these numbers could be higher than 4,000. Meanwhile, in the United States, missing persons statistics exist for every other demographic except for Native American women, who, according to the New York Times, are ten times more likely to be murdered than other Americans.\r<\/p><p>\u201cGrowing up as an Indigenous girl on the Prairies, you know you\u2019re not safe. As a teenager, being followed, having white men approach you, there\u2019s that fear. You know how you\u2019re valued in society,\u201d Jessica LaPlante told me. She has had two family members go missing. \r<\/p><p>Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised an independent inquiry into the issue during his campaign in 2015. Hope was short lived. The process, met with high profile resignations, delays, and controversy, has only served to open old wounds and highlight the injustices that persist among Indigenous communities. Unlike in Canada, where there has been some acknowledgment of MMIW, the United States has done little to address the issue. \r<\/p><p>My work on this issue began in April 2017, when I returned to Saskatchewan, my home, to meet with families of missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW) and elders across the province. I wanted to photograph the families of MMIW in a way that wasn\u2019t desensitized and re-traumatizing; making portraits and evidential landscapes that told their stories in a humane and intimate manner. I photographed only women and documented them in their most emotional spaces: the places where they felt closest to their loved ones. \r<\/p><p>They signify the voices of their mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends who have been lost, persisting and fighting for justice. \r<\/p><p>With support from PHmuseum, I hope to continue my work in the United States. I\u2019ve identified several communities across three states to create a nuanced record of the young women and family members who are closest to the issue of MMIW. I\u2019d like to focus on young females in the throes of adolescence who are some of the most vulnerable to suicide. With many victims living in isolated communities, distrustful of bureaucratic justice systems, it is crucial to hear their stories and understand why this issue remains so pervasive, yet unheard. \r<\/p><p>My primary objective with this work in addition to publication is to pay homage to communities who have lost females to murder or disappearance through a healing and captivating exhibition I envision this exhibition to be ceremonial and to incorporate imagery of surviving family members, along with sacred items, letters written to victims, poems, traditional chants, and space for prayer. Eventually, and in conjunction with the exhibition, I hope to create a photo book with the series of images I make that acts as evidence to what Indigenous and Native American women have long endured and is a call to action for those who continue to downplay the issue. \r<\/p><p>With funding from the International Reporting Project, I made significant headway with communities and organizations in Saskatchewan. This work has been published in Vice Magazine, the Walrus Magazine (Gold Winner in the National Magazine Award) and was exhibited in a solo show at NYU\u2019s Gallatin Galleries. \r<\/p><p>My drive to continue this project stems from my own shame and outrage. I grew up in this society and remained blind to the suffering of my Indigenous sisters. With this work, I hope to give Indigenous women an outlet to share their stories, awaken others to this assault on humanity and however miniscule, perhaps a step towards healing. \r<\/p>","body_raw":"On September 25, 2013, in Regina, Saskatchewan, Kelly Goforth\u2019s body was found, inside a hockey bag, at the bottom of a dumpster. Goforth\u2019s killer, a white male, also killed Richele Bear, another Indigenous woman. Goforth\u2019s family believes he may have murdered others. \r\n\r\nGoforth\u2019s death is not an isolated incident in Saskatchewan, one of many areas in North America struggling with a shameful record of abuse, neglect, and indifference toward its Indigenous women and populations. \r\n\r\nIndigenous communities in North American experience high levels of poverty and are plagued by addiction, family breakdown, and some of the highest suicide rates in the world. 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Hope was short lived. The process, met with high profile resignations, delays, and controversy, has only served to open old wounds and highlight the injustices that persist among Indigenous communities. Unlike in Canada, where there has been some acknowledgment of MMIW, the United States has done little to address the issue. \r\n\r\nMy work on this issue began in April 2017, when I returned to Saskatchewan, my home, to meet with families of missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW) and elders across the province. I wanted to photograph the families of MMIW in a way that wasn\u2019t desensitized and re-traumatizing; making portraits and evidential landscapes that told their stories in a humane and intimate manner. I photographed only women and documented them in their most emotional spaces: the places where they felt closest to their loved ones. \r\n\r\nThey signify the voices of their mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends who have been lost, persisting and fighting for justice. \r\n\r\nWith support from PHmuseum, I hope to continue my work in the United States. I\u2019ve identified several communities across three states to create a nuanced record of the young women and family members who are closest to the issue of MMIW. I\u2019d like to focus on young females in the throes of adolescence who are some of the most vulnerable to suicide. 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Her mom would want good things for her.\u201d","position":0,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc24s81c8a316f4.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161476,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc24s81c8a316f4.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:36:28","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:36:28"},"video":null}},{"id":108853,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":218173,"position":0,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:36:20","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"The North Saskatchewan River, located just outside of Prince Albert, where Beatrice Adam\u2019s body was found on October 12, 2014. 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Beatrice disappeared along with her boyfriend, who has not been seen since. \u201cShe\u2019s gone now,\u201d said Beatrice\u2019s father, Allan Adam. \u201cWe just want to know how she died.\u201d","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":218173,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/9773\/pflxgjdae5a90e66.jpg","created_at":"2018-09-25 10:36:20","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:36:20"},"story_block":null},{"id":108841,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124366,"image_id":161477,"position":1,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"From left to right: Marcia Bird, 19; Margaret Bird, 20; Aleisha Charles, 21; and Ariel Charles, 17, of La Ronge, pictured in Prince Albert, while searching for their mother. Some of the daughters had vivid dreams about where their mother might be, and with little police support, instigated a search on their own. In November, the police finally helped organize a search in which around 15 family and community members spent the weekend looking around an area six miles or so north of Prince Albert.","caption_raw":"From left to right: Marcia Bird, 19; Margaret Bird, 20; Aleisha Charles, 21; and Ariel Charles, 17, of La Ronge, pictured in Prince Albert, while searching for their mother. Some of the daughters had vivid dreams about where their mother might be, and with little police support, instigated a search on their own. In November, the police finally helped organize a search in which around 15 family and community members spent the weekend looking around an area six miles or so north of Prince Albert.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161477,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2fi4d37876e3c.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:42:55","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:42:55"},"story_block":{"id":124366,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161477,"video_id":null,"caption":"Marcia Bird, Margaret Bird, Aleisha Charles, and Ariel Charles, all between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two, are pictured in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Happy Charles, the girls\u2019 mother, went missing in April, and some of the daughters have since had vivid dreams about where she might be. They\u2019ve been in touch with the authorities, but with little trust in the police\u2019s ability and willingness to help, the sisters and their grandmother have started a search on their own.","caption_raw":"Marcia Bird, Margaret Bird, Aleisha Charles, and Ariel Charles, all between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two, are pictured in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Happy Charles, the girls\u2019 mother, went missing in April, and some of the daughters have since had vivid dreams about where she might be. They\u2019ve been in touch with the authorities, but with little trust in the police\u2019s ability and willingness to help, the sisters and their grandmother have started a search on their own.","position":1,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2fi4d37876e3c.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161477,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2fi4d37876e3c.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:42:55","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:42:55"},"video":null}},{"id":108842,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124367,"image_id":161478,"position":2,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Aleisha Charles, 21, shows a tattoo dedicated to her mother, Happy Charles, whose name in Cree, \u201cKokuminahkisis,\u201d means \u201cblack widow.\u201d Aleisha and her three other sisters traveled to Prince Albert from La Ronge, more than 100 miles, to search for their mother, who went missing at the beginning of April 2017. Though their mother is addicted to intravenous drugs and has been in and out of rehab since she was a teenager, she has never been missing for this long, according to Regina Poitras, Happy\u2019s mother. Happy Charles remains missing to this day.","caption_raw":"Aleisha Charles, 21, shows a tattoo dedicated to her mother, Happy Charles, whose name in Cree, \u201cKokuminahkisis,\u201d means \u201cblack widow.\u201d Aleisha and her three other sisters traveled to Prince Albert from La Ronge, more than 100 miles, to search for their mother, who went missing at the beginning of April 2017. Though their mother is addicted to intravenous drugs and has been in and out of rehab since she was a teenager, she has never been missing for this long, according to Regina Poitras, Happy\u2019s mother. Happy Charles remains missing to this day.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161478,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2g345e3337ed0.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:15","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:15"},"story_block":{"id":124367,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161478,"video_id":null,"caption":"Aleisha shows a tattoo dedicated to her mother, whose Cree name is Kokuminahkisis, meaning black widow. According to Regina Poitras, Happy\u2019s mother, her daughter has long been addicted to drugs. She sometimes disappears without warning, but she usually returns home within a week. Months after her most recent disappearance, Happy is still missing.","caption_raw":"Aleisha shows a tattoo dedicated to her mother, whose Cree name is Kokuminahkisis, meaning black widow. According to Regina Poitras, Happy\u2019s mother, her daughter has long been addicted to drugs. She sometimes disappears without warning, but she usually returns home within a week. Months after her most recent disappearance, Happy is still missing.","position":2,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2g345e3337ed0.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161478,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2g345e3337ed0.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:15","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:15"},"video":null}},{"id":108843,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124368,"image_id":161479,"position":3,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Tracey George Heese, 42, sits in a tepee on buffalo skin, a symbol that reminds her of her late mother, Winnifred George. Winnifred was murdered and discovered next to a park bench in Edmonton, Alberta, more than 20 years ago. Tracey still has no answers. \u201cThis buffalo skin represents Canada, this North America. This was [our ancestor\u2019s] land. I think of all the buffalo that were slaughtered [here]\u2026 Are aboriginal women to be sacrificed as the buffalo have?\u201d said Tracey. \u201cNot enough is being done. The Canadian system is derailing us\u2026 growing up and hearing of these deaths of our aboriginal women, it doesn\u2019t matter if we\u2019re educated. All you have to say is she\u2019s aboriginal, and people have that stereotype.\u201d ","caption_raw":"Tracey George Heese, 42, sits in a tepee on buffalo skin, a symbol that reminds her of her late mother, Winnifred George. Winnifred was murdered and discovered next to a park bench in Edmonton, Alberta, more than 20 years ago. Tracey still has no answers. \u201cThis buffalo skin represents Canada, this North America. This was [our ancestor\u2019s] land. I think of all the buffalo that were slaughtered [here]\u2026 Are aboriginal women to be sacrificed as the buffalo have?\u201d said Tracey. \u201cNot enough is being done. The Canadian system is derailing us\u2026 growing up and hearing of these deaths of our aboriginal women, it doesn\u2019t matter if we\u2019re educated. All you have to say is she\u2019s aboriginal, and people have that stereotype.\u201d ","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161479,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2gs16f60ddfc0.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:41","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:41"},"story_block":{"id":124368,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161479,"video_id":null,"caption":"Tracey George Heese sits on buffalo skin in a teepee in Saskatchewan. Heese\u2019s mother, Winnifred George, was found dead on an Edmonton park bench over twenty years ago. \u201cI think of all the buffalo that were slaughtered [here],\u201d Heese says. \u201cAre Aboriginal women to be sacrificed as the buffalo have? Not enough is being done, the Canadian system is derailing us.\u201d","caption_raw":"Tracey George Heese sits on buffalo skin in a teepee in Saskatchewan. Heese\u2019s mother, Winnifred George, was found dead on an Edmonton park bench over twenty years ago. \u201cI think of all the buffalo that were slaughtered [here],\u201d Heese says. \u201cAre Aboriginal women to be sacrificed as the buffalo have? Not enough is being done, the Canadian system is derailing us.\u201d","position":3,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2gs16f60ddfc0.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161479,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2gs16f60ddfc0.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:41","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:43:41"},"video":null}},{"id":108854,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":218174,"position":4,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:37:36","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Tanya Sayer, 38, estimates she has known ten indigenous women who have gone missing or been murdered, including some of serial killer Robert Pickton\u2019s victims. \u201cI\u2019ve been raped, left on the outskirts of town, held hostage, been involved in gangs,\u201d said Tanya, who says she was sucked into prostitution in her late teens. \u201cThe solution is only through the Creator, you have to want your life back,\u201d she said. \u201cThere\u2019s a spiritual sickness that comes from residential schools. It\u2019s this transgenerational trauma\u2026 When you sober up, it\u2019s just too painful\u2026 [The pain] never goes away. You just have to walk with it.\u201d In many cases, women who have been victims of murder or abuse are in vulnerable life circumstances like Tanya. According to Troy Cooper, who was the police chief of Prince Albert for 13 years until moving to Saskatoon this January, \u201cpeople take comfort in the idea that [murdered victims are] from a high-risk lifestyle, but sex workers are actually victims.\u201d ","caption_raw":"Tanya Sayer, 38, estimates she has known ten indigenous women who have gone missing or been murdered, including some of serial killer Robert Pickton\u2019s victims. \u201cI\u2019ve been raped, left on the outskirts of town, held hostage, been involved in gangs,\u201d said Tanya, who says she was sucked into prostitution in her late teens. \u201cThe solution is only through the Creator, you have to want your life back,\u201d she said. \u201cThere\u2019s a spiritual sickness that comes from residential schools. It\u2019s this transgenerational trauma\u2026 When you sober up, it\u2019s just too painful\u2026 [The pain] never goes away. You just have to walk with it.\u201d In many cases, women who have been victims of murder or abuse are in vulnerable life circumstances like Tanya. According to Troy Cooper, who was the police chief of Prince Albert for 13 years until moving to Saskatoon this January, \u201cpeople take comfort in the idea that [murdered victims are] from a high-risk lifestyle, but sex workers are actually victims.\u201d ","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":218174,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/9773\/pflxio01a29f18b2.jpg","created_at":"2018-09-25 10:37:36","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:37:36"},"story_block":null},{"id":108849,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124374,"image_id":161485,"position":5,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Wood burns in preparation for a sweat lodge on the outskirts of Regina. Many women facing the loss of a loved one have turned to sweat, ceremony, and traditional teachings. \u201cThe healing started from that first sweat. I sweat for four days,\u201d said Gwenda Yuzicappi, whose daughter was found dead on Little Black Bear First Nation on May 5, 2008. \u201cI still need all those ceremonies.\"","caption_raw":"Wood burns in preparation for a sweat lodge on the outskirts of Regina. Many women facing the loss of a loved one have turned to sweat, ceremony, and traditional teachings. \u201cThe healing started from that first sweat. I sweat for four days,\u201d said Gwenda Yuzicappi, whose daughter was found dead on Little Black Bear First Nation on May 5, 2008. \u201cI still need all those ceremonies.\"","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161485,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2tx5c0c8c795e.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:51:34","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:51:34"},"story_block":{"id":124374,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161485,"video_id":null,"caption":"Wood burns in preparation for a sweat lodge on the outskirts of Regina, Saskatchewan. Many women facing the loss of a loved one have turned to sweat, ceremony and traditional teachings. \u201cThe healing started from that first sweat. I sweat for four days,\u201d said Gwenda Yuzicappi, whose daughter\u2019s remains were found on Little Black Bear First Nation on May 7th, 2008. \u201cI still need all those ceremonies.\"","caption_raw":"Wood burns in preparation for a sweat lodge on the outskirts of Regina, Saskatchewan. Many women facing the loss of a loved one have turned to sweat, ceremony and traditional teachings. \u201cThe healing started from that first sweat. I sweat for four days,\u201d said Gwenda Yuzicappi, whose daughter\u2019s remains were found on Little Black Bear First Nation on May 7th, 2008. \u201cI still need all those ceremonies.\"","position":9,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2tx5c0c8c795e.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161485,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2tx5c0c8c795e.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:51:34","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:51:34"},"video":null}},{"id":108845,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124370,"image_id":161481,"position":6,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Mary Tremblay, 33, finds solitude in La Ronge. Mary\u2019s sister, Julie Houghton, was found dead in a ditch along the highway between Quinton and Raymore in 2005. Her death remains unsolved. \u201cI would like to find the man who killed my sister,\u201d Mary said. Thirty-five cases of missing and murdered indigenous women remain unsolved in Saskatchewan, but actual numbers are likely to be much higher.","caption_raw":"Mary Tremblay, 33, finds solitude in La Ronge. Mary\u2019s sister, Julie Houghton, was found dead in a ditch along the highway between Quinton and Raymore in 2005. Her death remains unsolved. \u201cI would like to find the man who killed my sister,\u201d Mary said. Thirty-five cases of missing and murdered indigenous women remain unsolved in Saskatchewan, but actual numbers are likely to be much higher.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161481,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2pm81f3d39be6.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:59","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:59"},"story_block":{"id":124370,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161481,"video_id":null,"caption":"Mary Tremblay walks among trees in La Ronge, Saskatchewan. In 2005, Mary\u2019s sister, Julie Houghton, was found dead in a ditch along the highway between Quinton and Raymore. To this day, Tremblay's family still doesn't know what happened to Houghton before her death. According to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 33 cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women remain unsolved in Saskatchewan, but numbers are likely to be much higher. \u201cI wish women and children would stop being abused\u2026I would like to find the man who killed my sister.\u201d","caption_raw":"Mary Tremblay walks among trees in La Ronge, Saskatchewan. In 2005, Mary\u2019s sister, Julie Houghton, was found dead in a ditch along the highway between Quinton and Raymore. To this day, Tremblay's family still doesn't know what happened to Houghton before her death. According to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 33 cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women remain unsolved in Saskatchewan, but numbers are likely to be much higher. \u201cI wish women and children would stop being abused\u2026I would like to find the man who killed my sister.\u201d","position":5,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2pm81f3d39be6.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161481,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2pm81f3d39be6.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:59","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:59"},"video":null}},{"id":108855,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":218175,"position":7,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:38:49","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"Linda Roberts, 36, remembers her daughter, Jadene Irving, during happier days outside of their home in La Ronge. Jadene committed suicide in her room in October 2016, at the age of 14. Jadene\u2019s best friend and classmate took her life a few weeks after. In the same month, six young girls committed suicide. According to the Canadian Broadcast Corporation, First Nations\u2019 youth lack hope. Self-esteem issues common at that age are compounded by poverty, inequality felt within communities, and lack of resources. Kids Help Phone, a charity organization that counsels children on the phone and online, concluded that 22 percent of Canadian teens considered suicide in 2016, and according to the Centre for Suicide prevention, indigenous youth were five to six times more likely to commit suicide than non-indigenous youth.","caption_raw":"Linda Roberts, 36, remembers her daughter, Jadene Irving, during happier days outside of their home in La Ronge. Jadene committed suicide in her room in October 2016, at the age of 14. Jadene\u2019s best friend and classmate took her life a few weeks after. In the same month, six young girls committed suicide. According to the Canadian Broadcast Corporation, First Nations\u2019 youth lack hope. Self-esteem issues common at that age are compounded by poverty, inequality felt within communities, and lack of resources. Kids Help Phone, a charity organization that counsels children on the phone and online, concluded that 22 percent of Canadian teens considered suicide in 2016, and according to the Centre for Suicide prevention, indigenous youth were five to six times more likely to commit suicide than non-indigenous youth.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":218175,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/9773\/pflxkoaba8dada0c.jpg","created_at":"2018-09-25 10:38:49","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:38:49"},"story_block":null},{"id":108844,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124369,"image_id":161480,"position":8,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:53:57","caption":"The sun rises over the Valley of Fort Qu\u2019Appelle. The Cree and the Saulteaux First Nations were once nomadic in these lands in search of buffalo. It was here, in 1874, where their rights and privileges to 75,000 square miles of land would be signed over to the Queen under Treaty 4.","caption_raw":"The sun rises over the Valley of Fort Qu\u2019Appelle. The Cree and the Saulteaux First Nations were once nomadic in these lands in search of buffalo. It was here, in 1874, where their rights and privileges to 75,000 square miles of land would be signed over to the Queen under Treaty 4.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161480,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2osf62657809d.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:28","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:28"},"story_block":{"id":124369,"story_id":13463,"image_id":161480,"video_id":null,"caption":"The sun rises over Qu\u2019Appelle Valley, seventy-five kilometres northeast of Regina. Here, in 1874, the Cree and Saulteaux peoples signed over 75,000 square miles of land to the Crown under Treaty Four.","caption_raw":"The sun rises over Qu\u2019Appelle Valley, seventy-five kilometres northeast of Regina. Here, in 1874, the Cree and Saulteaux peoples signed over 75,000 square miles of land to the Crown under Treaty Four.","position":4,"is_explicit":null,"is_admin_explicit":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","updated_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:21","meta":{"is_liked":false,"like_count":0},"activity_attributes":{"story":{"title":"Nobody Listened","started_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","ended_at":"2017-01-01 00:01:00","slug":"nobody-listened-1d9c1beed1","place":"Canada","user":{"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","profile":{"avatar":null}}},"image_filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2osf62657809d.jpg","video_meta":null},"image":{"id":161480,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc2osf62657809d.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:28","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:48:28"},"video":null}}],"cover_block_image":{"id":108840,"grant_submission_id":9773,"story_block_id":124365,"image_id":161476,"position":0,"created_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:24:06","caption":"Michelle Burns, thirty, sits with her ten-year-old niece, Dannataya, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Monica Lee, Dannataya\u2019s mother and Michelle\u2019s twin sister, was murdered in January 2015 by a thirty-eight-year-old white male she had met that night. He received a thirteen-year sentence. \u201cI feel lonesome a lot,\u201d Michelle says. \u201cI have to remember that [Dannataya] is watching me. When I walk, I try to walk with good intentions, so that when she\u2019s older she won\u2019t end up lost. Her mom would want good things for her.\u201d","caption_raw":"Michelle Burns, thirty, sits with her ten-year-old niece, Dannataya, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Monica Lee, Dannataya\u2019s mother and Michelle\u2019s twin sister, was murdered in January 2015 by a thirty-eight-year-old white male she had met that night. He received a thirteen-year sentence. \u201cI feel lonesome a lot,\u201d Michelle says. \u201cI have to remember that [Dannataya] is watching me. When I walk, I try to walk with good intentions, so that when she\u2019s older she won\u2019t end up lost. Her mom would want good things for her.\u201d","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":161476,"filename":"\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc24s81c8a316f4.jpg","created_at":"2017-10-05 04:36:28","updated_at":"2017-10-05 04:36:28"}},"user":{"id":25238,"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","can_skip_grant_payment":0,"is_unsubscribed_from_grant_emails":0,"disabled_at":null,"gender":"female","has_agreed_to_newsletter":0,"has_agreed_to_newsletter_at":null,"timezone":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"accepted_tandcs_may18_at":"2018-09-25 10:23:29","last_logged_in_at":"2018-09-25 10:23:29","created_at":"2017-01-03 03:39:13","updated_at":"2018-09-25 10:23:29","deleted_at":null,"meta":{"follower_count":0,"following_count":0,"auth_user_follows":false,"auth_user_blocks":false,"is_photographer":true,"is_curators_pick_photographer":true,"is_editor":false,"is_admin":false,"has_payout_details":false,"payout_service":false,"photographer_cover":"https:\/\/phmuseum.imgix.net\/users\/25238\/grant-submissions\/5544\/oxc24s81c8a316f4.jpg?dpr=2&fm=jpg&q=75&fit=max&w=800&auto=compress%2Cformat"},"awards":[],"publications":[],"profile":{"id":25219,"user_id":25238,"born_in_id":null,"based_in_id":null,"currently_in_id":null,"nationality_id":null,"avatar":null,"cover_image":null,"born_at":null,"profession":null,"bio":null,"long_bio":null,"long_bio_raw":null,"twitter_handle":null,"facebook_handle":null,"skype_handle":null,"google_plus_handle":null,"pinterest_handle":null,"instagram_handle":null,"vimeo_handle":null,"youtube_handle":null,"telephone":null,"show_explicit_content":"0","created_at":"2017-01-03 03:39:13","updated_at":"2017-01-03 03:39:13","currently_in":null,"based_in":null,"born_in":null,"nationality":null,"languages":[],"specialisations":[]},"notification_preferences":[{"id":1,"preference":"new_message","label":"I receive a new message","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":1}},{"id":2,"preference":"new_follow","label":"Someone follows me","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":2}},{"id":3,"preference":"new_story_comment","label":"Someone comments on a story I published","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":3}},{"id":4,"preference":"new_story_share","label":"Someone shares a story I published","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":4}},{"id":5,"preference":"new_post_comment","label":"Someone comments on a post I made","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":5}},{"id":6,"preference":"new_post_share","label":"Someone shares a post I made","is_disabled":0,"created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","pivot":{"user_id":25238,"preference_id":6}}],"mailchimp_subscriptions":[],"photographer":{"id":5454,"user_id":25238,"review_status_id":4,"curators_pick_review_status_id":4,"portfolio_url":null,"applied_at":null,"approved_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:20","curators_pick_applied_at":null,"curators_pick_approved_at":"2018-03-19 10:22:44","address_1":null,"address_2":null,"city":null,"region":null,"country":null,"postcode":null,"vat_id":null,"created_at":"2017-11-15 09:25:20","updated_at":"2018-03-19 10:22:44","deleted_at":null,"user_attributes":{"id":25238,"firstname":"Sara","lastname":"Hylton","username":"Sarahylton","name":"Sara Hylton","profile":{"avatar":null,"cover_image":null,"nationality":null,"currently_in":null,"bio":null}},"review_status":{"id":4,"label":"Approved","status":"approved","created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31"},"curators_pickreview_status":{"id":4,"label":"Approved","status":"approved","created_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31","updated_at":"2015-11-30 18:49:31"}},"editor":null,"billing":null}}