The Last Place On Earth (working title)

  • Bermuda's origin story, like most colonial territories, begins with the structuring of white and 'other'. Bermuda had no native people on it, but was soon populated with British settlers and their slaves. This hand written document, dated 1798, was a bill of sale from William Outerbridge of Hamilton Parish in Bermuda, to his son, for a slave named Peter. Peter was sold for 90 pounds at the age of 18-years-old and made the property of William Outerbridge Junior for the term of 'Forever'. * This document is part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society, which was donated anonymously to the organization in 2013.

  • This picture was taken looking out from the remains of an abandoned church called St. John's AME church. It was the first African Methodist Church to be established in Bermuda in 1881, approximately 40 years after the abolishment of slavery.

  • Dr. Eva Hodgson is a respected and outspoken race activist within the island of Bermuda, coming from a well-known and established black Bermudian family. During the days of segregation in her lifetime, from the 1950's till now, Dr. Hodgson has remained one of the most outspoken intellectuals on matters of race - always with a pulse on the various paradigms of race and race-relations within the island community. She became a controversial figure and regular commentator on the politics of whiteness with her weekly letters to the editor of our local newspaper, the Royal Gazette. Many of these writings are now considered to be eloquent and truthful criticisms of racism, and the treatment of black Bermudians. She is an author of one of the most influential black historical narratives of black Bermudian achievement titled, "First Class Men and Second Class Citizens,' published in 1963.

  • During the 1800’s agriculture used to be a staple in Bermudian society and the economy. Produce grown included citrus fruits, lettuce, kale, onions and lilies that were traded with the US and Canada. Black Bermudians, after emancipation, refused to be farmers as they felt it demeaned their skills as masons and carpenters. This paved the way for the migration of freed slaves from the Caribbean.

  • My parents hoist up the Bermudian flag, which features the Union Jack and our ties to the United Kingdom. We are one of the last and the oldest remaining British Overseas Territories, still beholden to the laws of England, with an appointed Governor that sits at the top of 33 acres of land. His property is the largest open space left in Bermuda.

  • Philanthropist and environmentalist, Andrew Stevenson, drinks a glass of merlot at his brother's house in Devonshire Bay - a traditionally white and prestigious neighborhood on the island of Bermuda.

  • Sandra Butterfield is the Executive Director of a drug rehabilitation centre called 'Focus Counseling Services', located in the heart of Bermuda's capital of Hamilton. Mrs. Butterfield was one of the first Bermudians to take on the issue of drug rehabilitation on the island. She was also one of the first white Bermudians to be public about her interracial marriage in the early 1970's, and was ostracized by her family and other members of the community for many years. She related the challenges they faced as a couple, but how they also created their own community of tolerance and compassion through their marriage.

  • Holy Trinity Church is one of the oldest churches in the western hemisphere. It is an Anglican church located at the eastern end of the island. This church was established in 1623, just 14 years after the wreck of the Sea Venture and the settlement of the island by the surviving British sailors.

  • Southlands is an abandoned 37-acre estate that dates back to the early 1700's. The property was left to deteriorate by the last property owner, a rich American businessman named James Morgan, who bought the property in 1911. He died in 1932, leaving the property unattended and passed over from hand-to-hand. Now the estate is a secret haven for locals, and sometimes squatters in the local parish, who are unable to afford the cost of rent in Bermuda's very affluent housing market.

  • Dr. Michael Bradshaw is a historian and president of the Bermuda Friendly Societies Association - an organisation that has existed since 1832 in Bermuda. The Friendly Society played a crucial role in helping former slaves create a new life for themselves after the abolition of slavery in 1834. Dr. Bradshaw is passionate about keeping the history and legacy of this organization alive, and continuing to serve the community under the codes and morals of the Friendly Society.

  • Two youths are dressed in Corporal regiment uniforms in the trails surrounding Warwick Camp. The Royal Bermuda Regiment (RBR) is the home defense unit of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. It was formed by the amalgamation of two voluntary units in 1965 - the mostly black Bermuda Militia Artillery (BMA), and the almost entirely white Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps (BVRC).

  • Gates Fort, built around 1612, is located at the end of the Cut Road in St. George Bermuda. It sits facing a man made channel created for ships to enter the town of St. Georges, the original settlement of Bermuda. Gates Fort, with its great vantage point overlooking the Town Cut, was built to stop any suspect or enemy boats to enter St. Georges Harbor from the open sea. It was named after Thomas Gates, the Governor elect of Jamestown Virginia, whose need for additional supplies from England caused the Sea Venture crash on the reefs of Bermuda in 1609 - marooning the original British settlers there and ' setting the stage' for Bermuda's human story.

  • Dale Butler is a storyteller and social activist within the community of Bermuda. He has been recognized for his contribution to the island's history by writing several books and short stories on the hidden and unknown aspects of our heritage. He was a politician within the Progressive Labour Party after it was elected into power in 1998, and served the party till 2012. The Progressive Labour Party (PLP) was, and still is, perceived as the black Bermuda party. Established in 1963, it was born in response to the leading white party on the island at the time, called the United Bermuda Party (UBP).

  • Space is almost non-existent on the island of Bermuda, with only 21-square-miles of land, and a population still growing from 70,000 residents. Every space of green inevitably gets cut-up into new housing. Cutting the limestone and limestone quarries are historical ways in which we have built our houses. It was the Bermudian slaves who built our infrastructure from the very beginning, revered for their skills as masons and builders. After slavery was abolished, many black Bermudian families had to help each other build their own homes, clubs, schools and churches, without any support from their previous white slave owners.

  • There is a line of Native American descendants dating back to the founding of the island of Bermuda in the 1600's. They were brought over as 'indentured servants' from the Unites States during the Colonial Wars, used for pearl diving, farming and whaling. Ishta Paynter is a descendant of one of the many Native American tribes that were brought over as captured slaves. Unfortunately, details of the tribes captured were not recorded by the white colonists.

  • An office chair sits in a hidden alcove behind a fortress in the town of St. Georges – where the first settlement on the island was founded in 1609. Today, the insurance and reinsurance sector of Bermuda has dominated the island’s economy and has also become the leading offshore financial service center in the world. Bermuda has now been coined a ‘tax haven’ by the international community, boasting the highest GDP in the world – but for only a few.

  • Caitlyn Conyers is a lawyer, with a PhD in African Studies, and works with an organization known as C.U.R.B. (Citizens Uprooting Racism in Bermuda) – which facilitates restorative practices and community talks across the island to address the islands racist past. She is a descendant of one of the original settlers to the island of Bermuda in 1609, and her family’s wealth and privilege is a direct result of the colonial system and the trans Atlantic slave trade. It is because of this legacy, that she has dedicated her life to race relations on the island. Her grandfather, Sir. David Gibbons, was Premier of the island in the 1970’s during our race riots – sparked when two black Bermudians were hanged for assassinating the British Governor and Police Commissioner.

  • Post emancipation, many freed slaves and their children took on the last names of their previous ‘owners’. This was often done as a means of legitimizing the black Bermudian children of white slave owners who may or may not be the biological fathers. Today, although statistics show that 60 % of the population identify as black, and 30% identify as white, there is no doubt that a large portion of descendants are in fact a mixture. This is the portrait of 'Master Robert Tucker', photographed in the 1800’s. * Part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society.

  • Generation Z: defined as children born after the millennials, during the mid 90's or early 2000’s. These young Bermudian girls are representative of what will be the future generation of the island. They will have to take up the challenge of navigating through the legacy of generational trauma and the island's colonial past; finding strength in their shared human stories, of which we are all connected. (Left to Right) Cary Fuhrtz, Kyiah Robinson, Kenya Robinson and Jorden Green.

  • A full moon shines light in the darkness on the south shore of the island, in the parish of Devonshire.

{"id":19912,"grant_id":11,"user_id":26658,"grant_submission_status_id":4,"grant_result_type_id":null,"cover_block_id":223310,"story_id":23356,"place_id":null,"title":"The Last Place On Earth (working title)","excerpt":null,"excerpt_raw":null,"body":"<p>\u2018The Last Place on Earth\u2019 (working title) is a multi-chaptered narrative that seeks to explore the complex identities and cultural inheritance of one of the last remaining British Overseas Territories on earth, the island of Bermuda. \r<\/p><p>Born and raised in this community, this documentary is both a personal journey and an investigation into the layers of our past, soaked in centuries of post-colonial trauma and the echoes of an empire. \r<\/p><p>The project will explore Bermuda\u2019s identity, including historic events that have shaped the country's social paradigms such as the African Diaspora, the history of inheritance, lineage, whiteness and the legacy of a British Colonial system \u2013 in juxtaposition with the narratives that are often associated with Bermuda today as a tourist destination and mythological island.\r<\/p><p>Starting in 2018, the project aims to go beneath the surface and into the heart of one of the most isolated countries in the world - whose present is in many ways a concentrated version of its past. The project begs the question; can such an isolated community with such a complex history ever heal from the past?\r<\/p><p>I aim to visualize Bermuda\u2019s past and contemporary identity by interviewing and photographing members of the community, both young and old, about their position in the conversation on race, power and identity in Bermuda. In particular, I will include individuals and persons who have been vocal about the realities of race and power in the country, and who have witnessed the changes over the last century. The project also includes important artifacts and locations significant to our island's origin story and the social structures and institutions in place today.\r<\/p><p>In a community of just 70,000 people, with a ratio of 60\/40, black and white, this work explores our heroes and heroines, our ghosts and demons - and how we ultimately perceive one another and 'accept' one another in the face of global challenges. It is a study of \u2018home\u2019 and a reflection on the complexities of place and identity.<\/p>","body_raw":"\u2018The Last Place on Earth\u2019 (working title) is a multi-chaptered narrative that seeks to explore the complex identities and cultural inheritance of one of the last remaining British Overseas Territories on earth, the island of Bermuda. \r\n\r\nBorn and raised in this community, this documentary is both a personal journey and an investigation into the layers of our past, soaked in centuries of post-colonial trauma and the echoes of an empire. \r\n\r\nThe project will explore Bermuda\u2019s identity, including historic events that have shaped the country's social paradigms such as the African Diaspora, the history of inheritance, lineage, whiteness and the legacy of a British Colonial system \u2013 in juxtaposition with the narratives that are often associated with Bermuda today as a tourist destination and mythological island.\r\n\r\nStarting in 2018, the project aims to go beneath the surface and into the heart of one of the most isolated countries in the world - whose present is in many ways a concentrated version of its past. The project begs the question; can such an isolated community with such a complex history ever heal from the past?\r\n\r\nI aim to visualize Bermuda\u2019s past and contemporary identity by interviewing and photographing members of the community, both young and old, about their position in the conversation on race, power and identity in Bermuda. In particular, I will include individuals and persons who have been vocal about the realities of race and power in the country, and who have witnessed the changes over the last century. The project also includes important artifacts and locations significant to our island's origin story and the social structures and institutions in place today.\r\n\r\nIn a community of just 70,000 people, with a ratio of 60\/40, black and white, this work explores our heroes and heroines, our ghosts and demons - and how we ultimately perceive one another and 'accept' one another in the face of global challenges. 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Bermuda had no native people on it, but was soon populated with British settlers and their slaves. This hand written document, dated 1798, was a bill of sale from William Outerbridge of Hamilton Parish in Bermuda, to his son, for a slave named Peter. Peter was sold for 90 pounds at the age of 18-years-old and made the property of William Outerbridge Junior for the term of 'Forever'. \r\n* This document is part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society, which was donated anonymously to the organization in 2013.","caption_raw":"Bermuda's origin story, like most colonial territories, begins with the structuring of white and 'other'. Bermuda had no native people on it, but was soon populated with British settlers and their slaves. This hand written document, dated 1798, was a bill of sale from William Outerbridge of Hamilton Parish in Bermuda, to his son, for a slave named Peter. Peter was sold for 90 pounds at the age of 18-years-old and made the property of William Outerbridge Junior for the term of 'Forever'. \r\n* This document is part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society, which was donated anonymously to the organization in 2013.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342966,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e3d1141a501bd.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:01","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:01"},"story_block":null},{"id":223294,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342980,"position":2,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:32","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"This picture was taken looking out from the remains of an abandoned church called St. John's AME church. It was the first African Methodist Church to be established in Bermuda in 1881, approximately 40 years after the abolishment of slavery.","caption_raw":"This picture was taken looking out from the remains of an abandoned church called St. John's AME church. It was the first African Methodist Church to be established in Bermuda in 1881, approximately 40 years after the abolishment of slavery.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342980,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4813a7666345.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:32","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:32"},"story_block":null},{"id":223305,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342991,"position":3,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Dr. Eva Hodgson is a respected and outspoken race activist within the island of Bermuda, coming from a well-known and established black Bermudian family. During the days of segregation in her lifetime, from the 1950's till now, Dr. Hodgson has remained one of the most outspoken intellectuals on matters of race - always with a pulse on the various paradigms of race and race-relations within the island community. She became a controversial figure and regular commentator on the politics of whiteness with her weekly letters to the editor of our local newspaper, the Royal Gazette. Many of these writings are now considered to be eloquent and truthful criticisms of racism, and the treatment of black Bermudians. She is an author of one of the most influential black historical narratives of black Bermudian achievement titled, \"First Class Men and Second Class Citizens,' published in 1963.","caption_raw":"Dr. Eva Hodgson is a respected and outspoken race activist within the island of Bermuda, coming from a well-known and established black Bermudian family. During the days of segregation in her lifetime, from the 1950's till now, Dr. Hodgson has remained one of the most outspoken intellectuals on matters of race - always with a pulse on the various paradigms of race and race-relations within the island community. She became a controversial figure and regular commentator on the politics of whiteness with her weekly letters to the editor of our local newspaper, the Royal Gazette. Many of these writings are now considered to be eloquent and truthful criticisms of racism, and the treatment of black Bermudians. She is an author of one of the most influential black historical narratives of black Bermudian achievement titled, \"First Class Men and Second Class Citizens,' published in 1963.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342991,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4m52a696adf1.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47"},"story_block":null},{"id":223311,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342997,"position":4,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:30:16","caption":"During the 1800\u2019s agriculture used to be a staple in Bermudian society and the economy. Produce grown included citrus fruits, lettuce, kale, onions and lilies that were traded with the US and Canada. \r\n\r\nBlack Bermudians, after emancipation, refused to be farmers as they felt it demeaned their skills as masons and carpenters. This paved the way for the migration of freed slaves from the Caribbean.","caption_raw":"During the 1800\u2019s agriculture used to be a staple in Bermudian society and the economy. Produce grown included citrus fruits, lettuce, kale, onions and lilies that were traded with the US and Canada. \r\n\r\nBlack Bermudians, after emancipation, refused to be farmers as they felt it demeaned their skills as masons and carpenters. This paved the way for the migration of freed slaves from the Caribbean.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342997,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4n511f3afad7.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48"},"story_block":null},{"id":223293,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342979,"position":5,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:31","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"My parents hoist up the Bermudian flag, which features the Union Jack and our ties to the United Kingdom. We are one of the last and the oldest remaining British Overseas Territories, still beholden to the laws of England, with an appointed Governor that sits at the top of 33 acres of land. His property is the largest open space left in Bermuda.","caption_raw":"My parents hoist up the Bermudian flag, which features the Union Jack and our ties to the United Kingdom. We are one of the last and the oldest remaining British Overseas Territories, still beholden to the laws of England, with an appointed Governor that sits at the top of 33 acres of land. His property is the largest open space left in Bermuda.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342979,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e47d5204e39b3.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:31","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:31"},"story_block":null},{"id":223297,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342983,"position":6,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:37","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Philanthropist and environmentalist, Andrew Stevenson, drinks a glass of merlot at his brother's house in Devonshire Bay - a traditionally white and prestigious neighborhood on the island of Bermuda. ","caption_raw":"Philanthropist and environmentalist, Andrew Stevenson, drinks a glass of merlot at his brother's house in Devonshire Bay - a traditionally white and prestigious neighborhood on the island of Bermuda. ","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342983,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4db67627542a.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:37","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:37"},"story_block":null},{"id":223300,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342986,"position":7,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:32:39","caption":"Sandra Butterfield is the Executive Director of a drug rehabilitation centre called 'Focus Counseling Services', located in the heart of Bermuda's capital of Hamilton. Mrs. Butterfield was one of the first Bermudians to take on the issue of drug rehabilitation on the island. She was also one of the first white Bermudians to be public about her interracial marriage in the early 1970's, and was ostracized by her family and other members of the community for many years. She related the challenges they faced as a couple, but how they also created their own community of tolerance and compassion through their marriage.","caption_raw":"Sandra Butterfield is the Executive Director of a drug rehabilitation centre called 'Focus Counseling Services', located in the heart of Bermuda's capital of Hamilton. Mrs. Butterfield was one of the first Bermudians to take on the issue of drug rehabilitation on the island. She was also one of the first white Bermudians to be public about her interracial marriage in the early 1970's, and was ostracized by her family and other members of the community for many years. She related the challenges they faced as a couple, but how they also created their own community of tolerance and compassion through their marriage.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342986,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4ka92863b83f.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44"},"story_block":null},{"id":223307,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342993,"position":8,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Holy Trinity Church is one of the oldest churches in the western hemisphere. It is an Anglican church located at the eastern end of the island. This church was established in 1623, just 14 years after the wreck of the Sea Venture and the settlement of the island by the surviving British sailors.","caption_raw":"Holy Trinity Church is one of the oldest churches in the western hemisphere. It is an Anglican church located at the eastern end of the island. This church was established in 1623, just 14 years after the wreck of the Sea Venture and the settlement of the island by the surviving British sailors.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342993,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4m5f405cd6cd.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47"},"story_block":null},{"id":223304,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342990,"position":9,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:19:47","caption":"Southlands is an abandoned 37-acre estate that dates back to the early 1700's. The property was left to deteriorate by the last property owner, a rich American businessman named James Morgan, who bought the property in 1911. He died in 1932, leaving the property unattended and passed over from hand-to-hand. Now the estate is a secret haven for locals, and sometimes squatters in the local parish, who are unable to afford the cost of rent in Bermuda's very affluent housing market.","caption_raw":"Southlands is an abandoned 37-acre estate that dates back to the early 1700's. The property was left to deteriorate by the last property owner, a rich American businessman named James Morgan, who bought the property in 1911. He died in 1932, leaving the property unattended and passed over from hand-to-hand. Now the estate is a secret haven for locals, and sometimes squatters in the local parish, who are unable to afford the cost of rent in Bermuda's very affluent housing market.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342990,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4m678cac53c8.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46"},"story_block":null},{"id":223309,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342995,"position":10,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:19:47","caption":"Dr. Michael Bradshaw is a historian and president of the Bermuda Friendly Societies Association - an organisation that has existed since 1832 in Bermuda. The Friendly Society played a crucial role in helping former slaves create a new life for themselves after the abolition of slavery in 1834. Dr. Bradshaw is passionate about keeping the history and legacy of this organization alive, and continuing to serve the community under the codes and morals of the Friendly Society.","caption_raw":"Dr. Michael Bradshaw is a historian and president of the Bermuda Friendly Societies Association - an organisation that has existed since 1832 in Bermuda. The Friendly Society played a crucial role in helping former slaves create a new life for themselves after the abolition of slavery in 1834. Dr. Bradshaw is passionate about keeping the history and legacy of this organization alive, and continuing to serve the community under the codes and morals of the Friendly Society.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342995,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4n6b22736e03.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47"},"story_block":null},{"id":223299,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342985,"position":11,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:40:11","caption":"Two youths are dressed in Corporal regiment uniforms in the trails surrounding Warwick Camp. The Royal Bermuda Regiment (RBR) is the home defense unit of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. It was formed by the amalgamation of two voluntary units in 1965 - the mostly black Bermuda Militia Artillery (BMA), and the almost entirely white Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps (BVRC).","caption_raw":"Two youths are dressed in Corporal regiment uniforms in the trails surrounding Warwick Camp. The Royal Bermuda Regiment (RBR) is the home defense unit of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. It was formed by the amalgamation of two voluntary units in 1965 - the mostly black Bermuda Militia Artillery (BMA), and the almost entirely white Bermuda Volunteer Rifle Corps (BVRC).","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342985,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4jcc75ea3734.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44"},"story_block":null},{"id":223303,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342989,"position":12,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Gates Fort, built around 1612, is located at the end of the Cut Road in St. George Bermuda. It sits facing a man made channel created for ships to enter the town of St. Georges, the original settlement of Bermuda. Gates Fort, with its great vantage point overlooking the Town Cut, was built to stop any suspect or enemy boats to enter St. Georges Harbor from the open sea. It was named after Thomas Gates, the Governor elect of Jamestown Virginia, whose need for additional supplies from England caused the Sea Venture crash on the reefs of Bermuda in 1609 - marooning the original British settlers there and ' setting the stage' for Bermuda's human story.","caption_raw":"Gates Fort, built around 1612, is located at the end of the Cut Road in St. George Bermuda. It sits facing a man made channel created for ships to enter the town of St. Georges, the original settlement of Bermuda. Gates Fort, with its great vantage point overlooking the Town Cut, was built to stop any suspect or enemy boats to enter St. Georges Harbor from the open sea. It was named after Thomas Gates, the Governor elect of Jamestown Virginia, whose need for additional supplies from England caused the Sea Venture crash on the reefs of Bermuda in 1609 - marooning the original British settlers there and ' setting the stage' for Bermuda's human story.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342989,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4mfb5a25c00e.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:46"},"story_block":null},{"id":223313,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342999,"position":13,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Dale Butler is a storyteller and social activist within the community of Bermuda. He has been recognized for his contribution to the island's history by writing several books and short stories on the hidden and unknown aspects of our heritage. He was a politician within the Progressive Labour Party after it was elected into power in 1998, and served the party till 2012. The Progressive Labour Party (PLP) was, and still is, perceived as the black Bermuda party. Established in 1963, it was born in response to the leading white party on the island at the time, called the United Bermuda Party (UBP).","caption_raw":"Dale Butler is a storyteller and social activist within the community of Bermuda. He has been recognized for his contribution to the island's history by writing several books and short stories on the hidden and unknown aspects of our heritage. He was a politician within the Progressive Labour Party after it was elected into power in 1998, and served the party till 2012. The Progressive Labour Party (PLP) was, and still is, perceived as the black Bermuda party. Established in 1963, it was born in response to the leading white party on the island at the time, called the United Bermuda Party (UBP).","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342999,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4n71a4f2ffe1.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48"},"story_block":null},{"id":223312,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342998,"position":14,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:33:51","caption":"Space is almost non-existent on the island of Bermuda, with only 21-square-miles of land, and a population still growing from 70,000 residents.\r\nEvery space of green inevitably gets cut-up into new housing. \r\n\r\nCutting the limestone and limestone quarries are historical ways in which we have built our houses. It was the Bermudian slaves who built our infrastructure from the very beginning, revered for their skills as masons and builders. \r\n\r\nAfter slavery was abolished, many black Bermudian families had to help each other build their own homes, clubs, schools and churches, without any support from their previous white slave owners.","caption_raw":"Space is almost non-existent on the island of Bermuda, with only 21-square-miles of land, and a population still growing from 70,000 residents.\r\nEvery space of green inevitably gets cut-up into new housing. \r\n\r\nCutting the limestone and limestone quarries are historical ways in which we have built our houses. It was the Bermudian slaves who built our infrastructure from the very beginning, revered for their skills as masons and builders. \r\n\r\nAfter slavery was abolished, many black Bermudian families had to help each other build their own homes, clubs, schools and churches, without any support from their previous white slave owners.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342998,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4n64721d5fa0.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48"},"story_block":null},{"id":223306,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342992,"position":15,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:34:28","caption":"There is a line of Native American descendants dating back to the founding of the island of Bermuda in the 1600's. They were brought over as 'indentured servants' from the Unites States during the Colonial Wars, used for pearl diving, farming and whaling. Ishta Paynter is a descendant of one of the many Native American tribes that were brought over as captured slaves. Unfortunately, details of the tribes captured were not recorded by the white colonists.","caption_raw":"There is a line of Native American descendants dating back to the founding of the island of Bermuda in the 1600's. They were brought over as 'indentured servants' from the Unites States during the Colonial Wars, used for pearl diving, farming and whaling. Ishta Paynter is a descendant of one of the many Native American tribes that were brought over as captured slaves. Unfortunately, details of the tribes captured were not recorded by the white colonists.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342992,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4m92dca5d871.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47"},"story_block":null},{"id":223310,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342996,"position":16,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:21:59","caption":"An office chair sits in a hidden alcove behind a fortress in the town of St. Georges \u2013 where the first settlement on the island was founded in 1609.\r\nToday, the insurance and reinsurance sector of Bermuda has dominated the island\u2019s economy and has also become the leading offshore financial service center in the world. Bermuda has now been coined a \u2018tax haven\u2019 by the international community, boasting the highest GDP in the world \u2013 but for only a few.","caption_raw":"An office chair sits in a hidden alcove behind a fortress in the town of St. Georges \u2013 where the first settlement on the island was founded in 1609.\r\nToday, the insurance and reinsurance sector of Bermuda has dominated the island\u2019s economy and has also become the leading offshore financial service center in the world. Bermuda has now been coined a \u2018tax haven\u2019 by the international community, boasting the highest GDP in the world \u2013 but for only a few.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342996,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4nc2637f2a93.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48"},"story_block":null},{"id":223308,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342994,"position":17,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:21:59","caption":"Caitlyn Conyers is a lawyer, with a PhD in African Studies, and works with an organization known as C.U.R.B. (Citizens Uprooting Racism in Bermuda) \u2013 which facilitates restorative practices and community talks across the island to address the islands racist past.\r\n\r\nShe is a descendant of one of the original settlers to the island of Bermuda in 1609, and her family\u2019s wealth and privilege is a direct result of the colonial system and the trans Atlantic slave trade. It is because of this legacy, that she has dedicated her life to race relations on the island.\r\n\r\nHer grandfather, Sir. David Gibbons, was Premier of the island in the 1970\u2019s during our race riots \u2013 sparked when two black Bermudians were hanged for assassinating the British Governor and Police Commissioner.","caption_raw":"Caitlyn Conyers is a lawyer, with a PhD in African Studies, and works with an organization known as C.U.R.B. (Citizens Uprooting Racism in Bermuda) \u2013 which facilitates restorative practices and community talks across the island to address the islands racist past.\r\n\r\nShe is a descendant of one of the original settlers to the island of Bermuda in 1609, and her family\u2019s wealth and privilege is a direct result of the colonial system and the trans Atlantic slave trade. It is because of this legacy, that she has dedicated her life to race relations on the island.\r\n\r\nHer grandfather, Sir. David Gibbons, was Premier of the island in the 1970\u2019s during our race riots \u2013 sparked when two black Bermudians were hanged for assassinating the British Governor and Police Commissioner.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342994,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4nd5cfa966cf.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:47"},"story_block":null},{"id":223295,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342981,"position":18,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:34","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:53:29","caption":"Post emancipation, many freed slaves and their children took on the last names of their previous \u2018owners\u2019. This was often done as a means of legitimizing the black Bermudian children of white slave owners who may or may not be the biological fathers. Today, although statistics show that 60 % of the population identify as black, and 30% identify as white, there is no doubt that a large portion of descendants are in fact a mixture. \r\n\r\nThis is the portrait of 'Master Robert Tucker', photographed in the 1800\u2019s.\r\n\r\n* Part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society.","caption_raw":"Post emancipation, many freed slaves and their children took on the last names of their previous \u2018owners\u2019. This was often done as a means of legitimizing the black Bermudian children of white slave owners who may or may not be the biological fathers. Today, although statistics show that 60 % of the population identify as black, and 30% identify as white, there is no doubt that a large portion of descendants are in fact a mixture. \r\n\r\nThis is the portrait of 'Master Robert Tucker', photographed in the 1800\u2019s.\r\n\r\n* Part of the collection of the Bermuda Historical Society.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342981,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4af7efaf63c3.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:34","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:34"},"story_block":null},{"id":223301,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342987,"position":19,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"Generation Z: \r\ndefined as children born after the millennials, during the mid 90's or early 2000\u2019s.\r\n\r\nThese young Bermudian girls are representative of what will be the future generation of the island. \r\nThey will have to take up the challenge of navigating through the legacy of generational trauma and the island's colonial past; finding strength in their shared human stories, of which we are all connected. \r\n\r\n(Left to Right) Cary Fuhrtz, Kyiah Robinson, Kenya Robinson and Jorden Green.","caption_raw":"Generation Z: \r\ndefined as children born after the millennials, during the mid 90's or early 2000\u2019s.\r\n\r\nThese young Bermudian girls are representative of what will be the future generation of the island. \r\nThey will have to take up the challenge of navigating through the legacy of generational trauma and the island's colonial past; finding strength in their shared human stories, of which we are all connected. \r\n\r\n(Left to Right) Cary Fuhrtz, Kyiah Robinson, Kenya Robinson and Jorden Green.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342987,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4kb4be08f307.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:44"},"story_block":null},{"id":223290,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342976,"position":20,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:20","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:14:53","caption":"A full moon shines light in the darkness on the south shore of the island, in the parish of Devonshire.","caption_raw":"A full moon shines light in the darkness on the south shore of the island, in the parish of Devonshire.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342976,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e3vfc88f3837f.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:20","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:20"},"story_block":null}],"cover_block_image":{"id":223310,"grant_submission_id":19912,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":342996,"position":16,"created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 22:21:59","caption":"An office chair sits in a hidden alcove behind a fortress in the town of St. Georges \u2013 where the first settlement on the island was founded in 1609.\r\nToday, the insurance and reinsurance sector of Bermuda has dominated the island\u2019s economy and has also become the leading offshore financial service center in the world. Bermuda has now been coined a \u2018tax haven\u2019 by the international community, boasting the highest GDP in the world \u2013 but for only a few.","caption_raw":"An office chair sits in a hidden alcove behind a fortress in the town of St. Georges \u2013 where the first settlement on the island was founded in 1609.\r\nToday, the insurance and reinsurance sector of Bermuda has dominated the island\u2019s economy and has also become the leading offshore financial service center in the world. Bermuda has now been coined a \u2018tax haven\u2019 by the international community, boasting the highest GDP in the world \u2013 but for only a few.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":342996,"filename":"\/users\/26658\/grant-submissions\/19912\/pz6e4nc2637f2a93.jpg","created_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48","updated_at":"2019-10-10 20:26:48"}},"user":{"id":26658,"firstname":"Nicola","lastname":"Muirhead","username":"nmuirheadphoto","can_skip_grant_payment":0,"is_unsubscribed_from_grant_emails":0,"disabled_at":null,"gender":"female","has_agreed_to_newsletter":0,"has_agreed_to_newsletter_at":null,"timezone":null,"is_legacy":0,"legacy_id":null,"accepted_tandcs_may18_at":"2018-10-24 16:44:26","last_logged_in_at":"2019-10-15 14:05:30","created_at":"2017-03-03 10:20:12","updated_at":"2019-10-15 14:05:30","deleted_at":null,"profile":{"id":26639,"user_id":26658,"born_in_id":145363,"based_in_id":58741,"currently_in_id":58741,"nationality_id":27,"avatar":"\/users\/26658\/avatars\/pz7dnsca8d4c3e48.jpg","cover_image":null,"born_at":"1986-02-05 00:02:00","profession":null,"bio":"I am a Bermudian documentary photographer and visual storyteller.","long_bio":"<p>Nicola Muirhead [b. 1986] I am a Bermudian documentary photographer, visual storyteller and photojournalist with an MA in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism from London College of Communication. My personal projects are research led, self-initiated assignments, that take a sociological approach to communities and individuals and how they are influenced by current social and political paradigms.<\/p><p>I also freelance as a photographer, specialising in portraiture, editorial and reportage. Moonlight as a visiting lecturer.<\/p>","long_bio_raw":"Nicola Muirhead [b. 1986] I am a Bermudian documentary photographer, visual storyteller and photojournalist with an MA in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism from London College of Communication. My personal projects are research led, self-initiated assignments, that take a sociological approach to communities and individuals and how they are influenced by current social and political paradigms.\n\nI also freelance as a photographer, specialising in portraiture, editorial and reportage. Moonlight as a visiting lecturer.","twitter_handle":"nmuirhead_photo","facebook_handle":"nmuirheadphoto","skype_handle":null,"google_plus_handle":null,"pinterest_handle":null,"instagram_handle":"nmuirhead_photo","vimeo_handle":"nicolamuirhead","youtube_handle":null,"telephone":null,"show_explicit_content":"0","created_at":"2017-03-03 10:20:12","updated_at":"2019-10-11 09:14:16"}}}