A State of Erosion

  • The 1000 mile Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada is one of two major rivers that flow into the Hudson Bay. In 1976 Manitoba Hydro diverted the river with the construction of the Missy Falls Control Structure at the mouth of South Indian Lake reducing the rivers flow to 15%. The diversion flooded the First Nation Community of South Indian Lake, forcing their displacement and devastative the second largest White Fish fishery in North America. The diversion increased the Nelson River flow, where most of Manitoba Hydro's dams are located, by 40%.

  • Robert Spence rests while cutting firewood on his trapline on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba Canada. Spence is an elected Councillor the Tataskweyak Cree Nation the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land and waters, but as a Councillor works closely with them to mitigate further impacts and seek compensation for damages.

  • A fisherman's boat approaches 8-mile Channel, an artificial channel created by Manitoba Hydro between Playgreen Lake and Lake Winnipeg as part of the Lake Winnipeg Regulation. Historical construction activities in the 1970's resulted in soil and groundwater contamination along with the presence of construction debris at the former construction sites. The channel was dug with the same machinery used to dig the Panama Canal.

  • Children play on the roof of an old cabin in the community Cross Lake. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the comunity through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Cross Lake has dealt with a rash of youth suicides in recent years. In 2016, 5 youth killed themselves, and there were 140 suicide attempts, they had the highest suicide rate in Canada.

  • Langford Saunders, President of the Norway House Fisherman's Co-op, rests in his boat after a day of commercial fishing on Lake Winnipeg in Northern Manitoba. Many fisherman complain of changes to their waterways due to hydro regulation; from a green slime and debris that gets caught in there nets, to an increase in lower grades of fish, such as mullet, instead of the more prized pickerel and white fish.

  • Helper James Simpson looks out the window of a fisherman's cabin on Playgreen Lake near Norway House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup continue to threaten the industry.

  • A woodlot on highway 6 in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Large amounts of forest were cleared with the construction of Manitoba Hydro's newest dam, Keeyask, on the Nelson River.

  • Pimicikamak First Nation Elder and knowledge keeper Edith Mary Blacksmith is photographed in her home in Cross Lake on her 91st birthday. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the community through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Blacksmith considers the imparts to be a cultural genocide.

  • A cemetery is illuminated by the Northern Lights in the First Nations community of Tataskweyak Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Manitoba hydro was forced to reinforce the banks surrounding the cemetery which sits on a point on the lake after erosion from fluctuating water levels began the threaten it. A number of bodies from more ancient cemeteries have been found eroding into the lake in recent years.

  • Fisherman pack their catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facility near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.

  • A buoy marks a fishing net on the north basin of Lake Winnipeg near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commerical fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutient buildup threaten the industry. Lake Winnipeg is the 12 largest freshwater lake and is the third largest hydroelectric reservoir in the world.

  • A deckhand loads his catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facilty near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.

  • Jackson Osborne holds up an old image showing a marsh that has now eroded in his community Cross Lake. Osborne considers himself an activist and documentarian, cataloging the impacts to his community by Manitoba Hydro.

  • Robert Spence looks through an eroded shoreline where human remains were recently found near the Northern Manitoba community of Split Lake. Erosion caused by fluctuating water levels has unearthed numerous historic burial grounds in the area. Spence is an elected Councillor in the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land.

  • Adam Spence reaches for a knife which rests a the "bible" or stomach while butchering a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake.

  • Chaiton Spence, 15, butchers a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. This was Chaiton's first kill while alone. For First Nations, killing and learning to butcher a Moose is a rite of passage. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake. In recent years fewer moose have been successfully hunted in and around the community of Split Lake than in the past. Many think it is due to the loss of willows, a favorite food source, along the riverbanks due to erosion from hydro.

  • Priest Martha Spence reads from a bible written in the Cree language in her home in Split Lake. Spence spent a year working as a Cultural Awareness Assistant at the Keeyask Dam site, working to reduce racism and prejudice towards first nations workers. Many workers complain that they are treated unfairly as First Nations employees.

  • Richard Spence, 12, holds a Canadian Goose killed by his father Adam before boarding a bush plane to return to Split Lake after a moose hunting trip on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba, Canada.

  • Kaelyn Moose, 6, stands for a portrait on her grandfather Robert Spence's trapline on the Churchill River during a fall moose hunting trip. Robert and his wife Melanie have made a priority of bringing their children and grandchildren out to the land, hoping to instill the values and traditions they hold dear.

  • A flock of Pelicans migrate over Playgreen Lake near Norway House First Nation on their way south for the winter season.

{"id":13424,"grant_id":10,"user_id":4523,"grant_submission_status_id":4,"grant_result_type_id":null,"cover_block_id":null,"story_id":17657,"place_id":null,"title":"A State of Erosion","excerpt":null,"excerpt_raw":null,"body":"<p>\u201cIs this the only way to get power, by destroying water?\u201d - Elder and former Chief of Tataskweyak First Nation, Michael Garson. \r<\/p><p>97% of the energy in the Canadian Province of Manitoba is produced by hydroelectricity. 75% of the power comes from five dams on the Nelson River, with a 6th currently in construction. Manitoba is proud to be a low greenhouse gas emitter and through that status claims to be an environmentally friendly energy producer. Growing up in Winnipeg, I always believed that story, unaware of the truth that was hidden in the north. \r<\/p><p>In reality the cheap, clean energy we took for granted was neither cheap, nor clean, we were just never the ones paying the true cost. Tataskweyak Cree Nation, Fox Lake, Norway House, Cross Lake, Grand Rapids, and South Indian Lake are just some of the communities who have bared the burden of our thirst for energy. Each were either displaced or confronted with a landscape they could no longer recognize. Flooding, erosion, fluctuating water levels, collapsing fisheries, and the loss of wildlife severely impacted their traditional economy and cultural way of life, forcing many into the welfare state or to find temporary work on the dams being built. In 1977 the federal government and Manitoba hydro signed the Northern Flood Agreement, which acknowledged the damage to the communities and promised to remediate it by obliterating poverty and supporting the creation of new economies, promises that went largely unfulfilled. \r<\/p><p>\u201cHydro has done what residential schools were unable to do, it has destroyed our culture.\u201d \u2013 Tataskweyak Elder Eunice Beardy. For these northern First Nations communities, dams are a silent oppression. Struggling against a slow violence, they grasp to the threads of their history and culture as the colonialist grip tightens, alienating future generations from knowing who they truly are.<\/p>","body_raw":"\u201cIs this the only way to get power, by destroying water?\u201d - Elder and former Chief of Tataskweyak First Nation, Michael Garson. \r\n\r\n97% of the energy in the Canadian Province of Manitoba is produced by hydroelectricity. 75% of the power comes from five dams on the Nelson River, with a 6th currently in construction. Manitoba is proud to be a low greenhouse gas emitter and through that status claims to be an environmentally friendly energy producer. Growing up in Winnipeg, I always believed that story, unaware of the truth that was hidden in the north. \r\n\r\nIn reality the cheap, clean energy we took for granted was neither cheap, nor clean, we were just never the ones paying the true cost. Tataskweyak Cree Nation, Fox Lake, Norway House, Cross Lake, Grand Rapids, and South Indian Lake are just some of the communities who have bared the burden of our thirst for energy. Each were either displaced or confronted with a landscape they could no longer recognize. Flooding, erosion, fluctuating water levels, collapsing fisheries, and the loss of wildlife severely impacted their traditional economy and cultural way of life, forcing many into the welfare state or to find temporary work on the dams being built. In 1977 the federal government and Manitoba hydro signed the Northern Flood Agreement, which acknowledged the damage to the communities and promised to remediate it by obliterating poverty and supporting the creation of new economies, promises that went largely unfulfilled. \r\n\r\n\u201cHydro has done what residential schools were unable to do, it has destroyed our culture.\u201d \u2013 Tataskweyak Elder Eunice Beardy. For these northern First Nations communities, dams are a silent oppression. Struggling against a slow violence, they grasp to the threads of their history and culture as the colonialist grip tightens, alienating future generations from knowing who they truly are.","is_shortlisted":1,"is_strong":0,"is_ongoing":1,"is_unpublished":0,"sent_first_email_reminder":0,"started_at":"2016-01-01 00:00:00","ended_at":null,"created_at":"2019-01-29 03:54:37","updated_at":"2019-03-07 15:04:47","place":null,"publications":[],"categories":[],"tags":[{"id":157,"tag":"portrait","created_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:38","updated_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:38","pivot":{"grant_submission_id":13424,"tag_id":157}},{"id":40,"tag":"landscape","created_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:37","updated_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:37","pivot":{"grant_submission_id":13424,"tag_id":40}},{"id":21,"tag":"documentary","created_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:37","updated_at":"2015-12-07 17:05:37","pivot":{"grant_submission_id":13424,"tag_id":21}}],"blocks":[{"id":150715,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264665,"position":-1,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:12","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"The 1000 mile Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada is one of two major rivers that flow into the Hudson Bay. In 1976 Manitoba Hydro diverted the river with the construction of the Missy Falls Control Structure at the mouth of South Indian Lake reducing the rivers flow to 15%. The diversion flooded the First Nation Community of South Indian Lake, forcing their displacement and devastative the second largest White Fish fishery in North America. The diversion increased the Nelson River flow, where most of Manitoba Hydro's dams are located, by 40%.","caption_raw":"The 1000 mile Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada is one of two major rivers that flow into the Hudson Bay. In 1976 Manitoba Hydro diverted the river with the construction of the Missy Falls Control Structure at the mouth of South Indian Lake reducing the rivers flow to 15%. The diversion flooded the First Nation Community of South Indian Lake, forcing their displacement and devastative the second largest White Fish fishery in North America. The diversion increased the Nelson River flow, where most of Manitoba Hydro's dams are located, by 40%.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264665,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhn8061a2d520.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:12","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:12"},"story_block":null},{"id":150732,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264682,"position":0,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:42","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Robert Spence rests while cutting firewood on his trapline on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba Canada. Spence is an elected Councillor the Tataskweyak Cree Nation the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land and waters, but as a Councillor works closely with them to mitigate further impacts and seek compensation for damages.","caption_raw":"Robert Spence rests while cutting firewood on his trapline on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba Canada. Spence is an elected Councillor the Tataskweyak Cree Nation the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land and waters, but as a Councillor works closely with them to mitigate further impacts and seek compensation for damages.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264682,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2riid04ee33945.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:42","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:42"},"story_block":null},{"id":150716,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264666,"position":1,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:14","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A fisherman's boat approaches 8-mile Channel, an artificial channel created by Manitoba Hydro between Playgreen Lake and Lake Winnipeg as part of the Lake Winnipeg Regulation. Historical construction activities in the 1970's resulted in soil and groundwater contamination along with the presence of construction debris at the former construction sites. The channel was dug with the same machinery used to dig the Panama Canal.","caption_raw":"A fisherman's boat approaches 8-mile Channel, an artificial channel created by Manitoba Hydro between Playgreen Lake and Lake Winnipeg as part of the Lake Winnipeg Regulation. Historical construction activities in the 1970's resulted in soil and groundwater contamination along with the presence of construction debris at the former construction sites. The channel was dug with the same machinery used to dig the Panama Canal.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264666,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhq2f390926eb.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:14","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:14"},"story_block":null},{"id":150723,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264673,"position":2,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:32","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Children play on the roof of an old cabin in the community Cross Lake. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the comunity through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Cross Lake has dealt with a rash of youth suicides in recent years. In 2016, 5 youth killed themselves, and there were 140 suicide attempts, they had the highest suicide rate in Canada.","caption_raw":"Children play on the roof of an old cabin in the community Cross Lake. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the comunity through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Cross Lake has dealt with a rash of youth suicides in recent years. In 2016, 5 youth killed themselves, and there were 140 suicide attempts, they had the highest suicide rate in Canada.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264673,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ri78fce96137c.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:32","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:32"},"story_block":null},{"id":150726,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264676,"position":3,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Langford Saunders, President of the Norway House Fisherman's Co-op, rests in his boat after a day of commercial fishing on Lake Winnipeg in Northern Manitoba. Many fisherman complain of changes to their waterways due to hydro regulation; from a green slime and debris that gets caught in there nets, to an increase in lower grades of fish, such as mullet, instead of the more prized pickerel and white fish.","caption_raw":"Langford Saunders, President of the Norway House Fisherman's Co-op, rests in his boat after a day of commercial fishing on Lake Winnipeg in Northern Manitoba. Many fisherman complain of changes to their waterways due to hydro regulation; from a green slime and debris that gets caught in there nets, to an increase in lower grades of fish, such as mullet, instead of the more prized pickerel and white fish.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264676,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2riaff46d291ee.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35"},"story_block":null},{"id":150713,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264663,"position":4,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:07:59","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Helper James Simpson looks out the window of a fisherman's cabin on Playgreen Lake near Norway House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup continue to threaten the industry.","caption_raw":"Helper James Simpson looks out the window of a fisherman's cabin on Playgreen Lake near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup continue to threaten the industry.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264663,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhb02bc7c9ce2.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:07:59","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:07:59"},"story_block":null},{"id":150721,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264671,"position":5,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:29","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A woodlot on highway 6 in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Large amounts of forest were cleared with the construction of Manitoba Hydro's newest dam, Keeyask, on the Nelson River.","caption_raw":"A woodlot on highway 6 in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Large amounts of forest were cleared with the construction of Manitoba Hydro's newest dam, Keeyask, on the Nelson River.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264671,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ri5f1d4cd94ed.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:29","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:29"},"story_block":null},{"id":150730,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264680,"position":6,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:40","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Pimicikamak First Nation Elder and knowledge keeper Edith Mary Blacksmith is photographed in her home in Cross Lake on her 91st birthday. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the community through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Blacksmith considers the imparts to be a cultural genocide.","caption_raw":"Pimicikamak First Nation Elder and knowledge keeper Edith Mary Blacksmith is photographed in her home in Cross Lake on her 91st birthday. Regulation from the Jen Peg dam has drastically impacted the community through drastic and sudden fluctuations in water level causing substantial long-term erosion, difficulty navigating the water by boat, and dangerous ice conditions for travel in the winter months. The cumulative impacts have devastated wildlife, fish populations, and eroded a cultural way of life. Blacksmith considers the imparts to be a cultural genocide.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264680,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rigee2695dba8.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:40","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:40"},"story_block":null},{"id":150728,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264678,"position":7,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A cemetery is illuminated by the Northern Lights in the First Nations community of Tataskweyak Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Manitoba hydro was forced to reinforce the banks surrounding the cemetery which sits on a point on the lake after erosion from fluctuating water levels began the threaten it. A number of bodies from more ancient cemeteries have been found eroding into the lake in recent years.","caption_raw":"A cemetery is illuminated by the Northern Lights in the First Nations community of Tataskweyak Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Manitoba hydro was forced to reinforce the banks surrounding the cemetery which sits on a point on the lake after erosion from fluctuating water levels began the threaten it. A number of bodies from more ancient cemeteries have been found eroding into the lake in recent years.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264678,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ridde980300cc.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37"},"story_block":null},{"id":150725,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264675,"position":8,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Fisherman pack their catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facility near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.","caption_raw":"Fisherman pack their catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facility near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264675,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ria8a27347182.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35"},"story_block":null},{"id":150727,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264677,"position":9,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A buoy marks a fishing net on the north basin of Lake Winnipeg near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commerical fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutient buildup threaten the industry. Lake Winnipeg is the 12 largest freshwater lake and is the third largest hydroelectric reservoir in the world.","caption_raw":"A buoy marks a fishing net on the north basin of Lake Winnipeg near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commerical fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutient buildup threaten the industry. Lake Winnipeg is the 12 largest freshwater lake and is the third largest hydroelectric reservoir in the world.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264677,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ribc26fffc502.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:35"},"story_block":null},{"id":150731,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264681,"position":10,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:41","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A deckhand loads his catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facilty near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.","caption_raw":"A deckhand loads his catch at the Playgreen Point Station processing facilty near Nelson House First Nation in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Commercial fishing is a main employer of Northern First Nations communities, but impacts to the water from hydroelectric development, erosion, and nutrient buildup threaten the industry.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264681,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rihb10d8a593e.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:41","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:41"},"story_block":null},{"id":150722,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264672,"position":11,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:31","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Jackson Osborne holds up an old image showing a marsh that has now eroded in his community Cross Lake. Osborne considers himself an activist and documentarian, cataloging the impacts to his community by Manitoba Hydro.","caption_raw":"Jackson Osborne holds up an old image showing a marsh that has now eroded in his community Cross Lake. Osborne considers himself an activist and documentarian, cataloging the impacts to his community by Manitoba Hydro.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264672,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ri60980b4fb14.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:31","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:31"},"story_block":null},{"id":150724,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264674,"position":12,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:33","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Robert Spence looks through an eroded shoreline where human remains were recently found near the Northern Manitoba community of Split Lake. Erosion caused by fluctuating water levels has unearthed numerous historic burial grounds in the area. Spence is an elected Councillor in the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land.","caption_raw":"Robert Spence looks through an eroded shoreline where human remains were recently found near the Northern Manitoba community of Split Lake. Erosion caused by fluctuating water levels has unearthed numerous historic burial grounds in the area. Spence is an elected Councillor in the community of Split Lake, he once provided for his family as a commercial fisherman and fur trapper, but left the profession after the fishery became unprofitable. Spence has long been a critic of Manitoba Hydro and decries their impact to his traditional land.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264674,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ri9701db3d506.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:33","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:33"},"story_block":null},{"id":150719,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264669,"position":13,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:23","updated_at":"2019-01-29 18:55:32","caption":"Adam Spence reaches for a knife which rests a the \"bible\" or stomach while butchering a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake.","caption_raw":"Adam Spence reaches for a knife which rests a the \"bible\" or stomach while butchering a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264669,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhy0439c95b90.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:23","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:23"},"story_block":null},{"id":150717,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264667,"position":14,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:18","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Chaiton Spence, 15, butchers a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. This was Chaiton's first kill while alone. For First Nations, killing and learning to butcher a Moose is a rite of passage. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake. In recent years fewer moose have been successfully hunted in and around the community of Split Lake than in the past. Many think it is due to the loss of willows, a favorite food source, along the riverbanks due to erosion from hydro.","caption_raw":"Chaiton Spence, 15, butchers a moose during an annual fall hunt on the Churchill River in Northern Manitoba, Canada. This was Chaiton's first kill while alone. For First Nations, killing and learning to butcher a Moose is a rite of passage. Moose are a subsistence staple for the northern First Nations communities. The meat is flown back by plan and shared with elders in the community of Split Lake. In recent years fewer moose have been successfully hunted in and around the community of Split Lake than in the past. Many think it is due to the loss of willows, a favorite food source, along the riverbanks due to erosion from hydro.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264667,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rht4c9f554b48.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:18","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:18"},"story_block":null},{"id":150729,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264679,"position":15,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Priest Martha Spence reads from a bible written in the Cree language in her home in Split Lake. Spence spent a year working as a Cultural Awareness Assistant at the Keeyask Dam site, working to reduce racism and prejudice towards first nations workers. Many workers complain that they are treated unfairly as First Nations employees.","caption_raw":"Priest Martha Spence reads from a bible written in the Cree language in her home in Split Lake. Spence spent a year working as a Cultural Awareness Assistant at the Keeyask Dam site, working to reduce racism and prejudice towards first nations workers. Many workers complain that they are treated unfairly as First Nations employees.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264679,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rid78fa144fa8.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:37"},"story_block":null},{"id":150714,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264664,"position":16,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:07","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Richard Spence, 12, holds a Canadian Goose killed by his father Adam before boarding a bush plane to return to Split Lake after a moose hunting trip on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba, Canada.","caption_raw":"Richard Spence, 12, holds a Canadian Goose killed by his father Adam before boarding a bush plane to return to Split Lake after a moose hunting trip on the Churchill River, in Northern Manitoba, Canada.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264664,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhi549b581924.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:07","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:07"},"story_block":null},{"id":150718,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264668,"position":17,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:20","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"Kaelyn Moose, 6, stands for a portrait on her grandfather Robert Spence's trapline on the Churchill River during a fall moose hunting trip. Robert and his wife Melanie have made a priority of bringing their children and grandchildren out to the land, hoping to instill the values and traditions they hold dear.","caption_raw":"Kaelyn Moose, 6, stands for a portrait on her grandfather Robert Spence's trapline on the Churchill River during a fall moose hunting trip. Robert and his wife Melanie have made a priority of bringing their children and grandchildren out to the land, hoping to instill the values and traditions they hold dear.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264668,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2rhv2e01f1d246.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:20","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:20"},"story_block":null},{"id":150720,"grant_submission_id":13424,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":264670,"position":18,"created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:27","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:23:51","caption":"A flock of Pelicans migrate over Playgreen Lake near Norway House First Nation on their way south for the winter season.","caption_raw":"A flock of Pelicans migrate over Playgreen Lake near Norway House First Nation on their way south for the winter season.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":264670,"filename":"\/users\/4523\/grant-submissions\/13424\/pm2ri33bbc262a41.JPG","created_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:27","updated_at":"2019-01-29 04:08:27"},"story_block":null}],"cover_block_image":null,"user":{"id":4523,"firstname":"Aaron","lastname":"Vincent Elkaim","username":"aaronvincentelkaim","can_skip_grant_payment":0,"is_unsubscribed_from_grant_emails":0,"disabled_at":null,"gender":"male","has_agreed_to_newsletter":0,"has_agreed_to_newsletter_at":null,"timezone":null,"is_legacy":1,"legacy_id":"c36e3d20-7ae4-11e2-af8c-57683d884ac3","accepted_tandcs_may18_at":"2019-01-29 17:46:15","last_logged_in_at":"2019-01-29 17:46:15","created_at":"2015-12-01 09:31:36","updated_at":"2019-01-29 19:02:35","deleted_at":null,"profile":{"id":4520,"user_id":4523,"born_in_id":10148,"based_in_id":10148,"currently_in_id":null,"nationality_id":35,"avatar":"\/users\/4523\/avatars\/nyoags738193375c.jpeg","cover_image":null,"born_at":"1981-03-12 00:00:00","profession":null,"bio":null,"long_bio":"<p>Aaron Vincent Elkaim (b.1981) is an independent Canadian documentary photographer and founding member of the Boreal Collective. His work focuses on historical narratives that examine cultural transitions within the modern economic, and geopolitical landscape. Aaron believes in the power of long-term work to allow greater understanding of a subject, and that only through proper understanding can a truly valid photographic perspective be presented. For him photography offers a gateway and motive to seek out, explore and better understand the human condition in our rapidly evolving world and seeks to provide new and varied perspectives on the complexities of humanity and its environment. He believes that the greatest photography is open ended; rather than providing answers, he urges us to ask questions.<\/p><p>Aaron\u2019s project Sleeping with the Devil won the 2012 Daylight Photo Award, he also received an hounorable mention for the 2012 Anthropographia Human Rights Through Visual Storytelling Award, and is a finalist of the 2012 Critical Mass Top 50. His past project A Co-Existence focused on the 2000-year old Jewish history of Morocco, it was exhibited at Voies-Off in Arles, the New York Photo Festival, Fotographia in Rome and the Reportage Photography Festival in Australia, in 2011. <\/p>","long_bio_raw":"Aaron Vincent Elkaim (b.1981) is an independent Canadian documentary photographer and founding member of the Boreal Collective. His work focuses on historical narratives that examine cultural transitions within the modern economic, and geopolitical landscape. Aaron believes in the power of long-term work to allow greater understanding of a subject, and that only through proper understanding can a truly valid photographic perspective be presented. For him photography offers a gateway and motive to seek out, explore and better understand the human condition in our rapidly evolving world and seeks to provide new and varied perspectives on the complexities of humanity and its environment. He believes that the greatest photography is open ended; rather than providing answers, he urges us to ask questions.\n\nAaron\u2019s project Sleeping with the Devil won the 2012 Daylight Photo Award, he also received an hounorable mention for the 2012 Anthropographia Human Rights Through Visual Storytelling Award, and is a finalist of the 2012 Critical Mass Top 50. His past project A Co-Existence focused on the 2000-year old Jewish history of Morocco, it was exhibited at Voies-Off in Arles, the New York Photo Festival, Fotographia in Rome and the Reportage Photography Festival in Australia, in 2011. \n","twitter_handle":null,"facebook_handle":null,"skype_handle":null,"google_plus_handle":null,"pinterest_handle":null,"instagram_handle":null,"vimeo_handle":null,"youtube_handle":null,"telephone":null,"show_explicit_content":"0","created_at":"2015-12-01 09:31:36","updated_at":"2019-01-29 19:02:35"}}}