80 Miles to Atlantis | Awarded Project - PhMuseum

80 Miles to Atlantis

  • Tarfaya buried open door I. The title 80 Miles to Atlantis refers to Tarfaya not by its name, but rather its close proximity to Spain’s Canary Islands, the approximate location of where the mythical Atlantis is rumored to be. The title also likens Tarfaya to the fictional island nation – a fitting relation given that, like Atlantis, it is shrouded in mystery and often described as “apocalyptic” or “the abandoned world.”

  • The Pool I. The pool inside the old Spanish fort. Written in 360 BCE, the Greek philosopher Plato’s dialogues Timaeus and Critias described the mythical nation of Atlantis as a near-utopian civilization inhabiting a lush, resource-rich archipelago. Plato claimed that the islands existed 9,000 years before his time, with its story passed down orally from his grandfather. As a consequence of falling out of favor with the deities, Atlantis was hit with earthquakes and floods, ultimately being submerged under water. If Atlantis was to be consumed by the ocean for displeasing the gods, Tarfaya’s historical coast, as Djamil illustrates in her series, is on its way to being devoured by sand, not for offending a higher being, but as a result of natural phenomena coupled with the state’s disinterest in preserving its cultural heritage.

  • The Pool II. The pool inside the old Spanish fort.

  • The Pool III. The pool inside the old Spanish fort.

  • 27 I. In the 27 triptych, six young men gather in another colonial-era building to celebrate a fictional birthday, complete with a cake and balloons. In the second photograph of the sequence, while five men cheer, one takes a snapshot of the festivities. The scene takes place in dār al-mi’a, or “house of one hundred,” which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.

  • 27 II. Dār al-mi’a, or “house of one hundred,” which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.

  • 27 III. Dār al-mi’a, or “house of one hundred,” which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.

  • The Theater I. The old theater, formerly called Cape Juby.

  • The Theater II. The old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. Although I identify as decolonial in thinking and practice, I often ask myself an important question that post-partitioned states have been grappling with since the mid-twentieth century’s independence movements: Are remnants of the colonial past, which today serve as Tarfaya’s identity marker, worth preserving? I think although colonial-era architecture is the result of imperial violence, likening it to a wound, over time it becomes a scar tamed by the landscape, leading to a shift in both function and meaning. Scars that, I believe, are worthy of preservation as the colonial past remains an inescapable part of Morocco’s cultural heritage.

  • The Theater III. The old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. In conversation with Sadat Shaibatat Merrebi Rebbu Ma al-‘Aynayn, a local resident and grandson of revolutionary leader Cheikh Mohamed Mustafa Ma al-‘Aynayn, I was told that one day everything on Tarfaya’s coast would disappear and that artworks, much like Plato’s writings on Atlantis, will remain as some of the last pieces of evidence for its existence.

  • By the yard I. A building inside the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Armed Forces.

  • In By the Yard II. Young children are seen playing in the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces (although not active) and avoided by local residents.

  • By the yard III. Young children are seen playing around dār al-mi’a, or “house of one hundred,” which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.

  • Armas Essalama. The plan the city had in mind for economic growth was tourism. A ferry line, Armas Assalama, was opened in 2008. Back in the day, Armas Assalama, connecting Puerto Rosario to Tarfaya was supposedly what would make the city another door to Africa and bring thousands of tourists a year from the Canary Islands, also generating a bunch of work opportunities in Tarfaya besides the small port business. The ferry crashed after 4 months and 42 trips only. In a lifetime of 4 months, it had become a new attraction for the locals that did expect a lot from it.

{"id":41681,"grant_id":18,"user_id":62495,"grant_submission_status_id":4,"grant_result_type_id":null,"cover_block_id":457591,"story_id":41788,"place_id":null,"title":"80 Miles to Atlantis","excerpt":"","excerpt_raw":"","body":"<p>80 Miles to Atlantis is the second part of Imane Djamil\u2019s work on the historic coastline of Tarfaya, a Saharan city that lies across the sea from the Canary Islands. In fact, the closeness of the Spanish archipelago, where the mythical city of Atlantis is thought to be located, inspired the name of this series. In 360 BC, the dialogues of Greek philosopher Plato, Timaeus and Critias, described the mythical state of Atlantis as\r<\/p><p>an almost Utopian civilisation, found on a lush and resource-rich archipelago. Plato claimed that these islands existed 9,000 years before his time and that their history had been passed on orally by his grandfather. While Atlantis was submerged by the ocean after falling out of favour with the Gods in Plato\u2019s story, Tarfaya\u2019s coastline is being engulfed by sand, not for offending a higher entity, but because of natural phenomena combined with the State\u2019s apathy towards preserving its cultural heritage. The abandonment of this city and its heritage is further highlighted by the desertification of the Sahara, which is prompting populations to flee to urban areas because they can no longer produce yields or envision activities in such hostile environment. Imane Djamil offers a fresh perspective and stands out for her use of a \u2018docu-drama\u2019 style to better express the reality she sees through her lens.<\/p>","body_raw":"80 Miles to Atlantis is the second part of Imane Djamil\u2019s work on the historic coastline of Tarfaya, a Saharan city that lies across the sea from the Canary Islands. In fact, the closeness of the Spanish archipelago, where the mythical city of Atlantis is thought to be located, inspired the name of this series. In 360 BC, the dialogues of Greek philosopher Plato, Timaeus and Critias, described the mythical state of Atlantis as\r\nan almost Utopian civilisation, found on a lush and resource-rich archipelago. Plato claimed that these islands existed 9,000 years before his time and that their history had been passed on orally by his grandfather. While Atlantis was submerged by the ocean after falling out of favour with the Gods in Plato\u2019s story, Tarfaya\u2019s coastline is being engulfed by sand, not for offending a higher entity, but because of natural phenomena combined with the State\u2019s apathy towards preserving its cultural heritage. The abandonment of this city and its heritage is further highlighted by the desertification of the Sahara, which is prompting populations to flee to urban areas because they can no longer produce yields or envision activities in such hostile environment. 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The title also likens Tarfaya to the fictional island nation \u2013 a fitting relation given that, like Atlantis, it is shrouded in mystery and often described as \u201capocalyptic\u201d or \u201cthe abandoned world.\u201d","caption_raw":"Tarfaya buried open door I.\r\n\r\nThe title 80 Miles to Atlantis refers to Tarfaya not by its name, but rather its close proximity to Spain\u2019s Canary Islands, the approximate location of where the mythical Atlantis is rumored to be. The title also likens Tarfaya to the fictional island nation \u2013 a fitting relation given that, like Atlantis, it is shrouded in mystery and often described as \u201capocalyptic\u201d or \u201cthe abandoned world.\u201d","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585795,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xq80f8669cb65.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:27:44.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:27:44.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457585,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585798,"position":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:14.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Pool I.\r\n\r\nThe pool inside the old Spanish fort.\r\n\r\nWritten in 360 BCE, the Greek philosopher Plato\u2019s dialogues Timaeus and Critias described the mythical nation of Atlantis as a near-utopian civilization inhabiting a lush, resource-rich archipelago. 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Plato claimed that the islands existed 9,000 years before his time, with its story passed down orally from his grandfather. As a consequence of falling out of favor with the deities, Atlantis was hit with earthquakes and floods, ultimately being submerged under water. If Atlantis was to be consumed by the ocean for displeasing the gods, Tarfaya\u2019s historical coast, as Djamil illustrates in her series, is on its way to being devoured by sand, not for offending a higher being, but as a result of natural phenomena coupled with the state\u2019s disinterest in preserving its cultural heritage.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585798,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xr24e987fe488.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:14.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:14.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457586,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585799,"position":1,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:17.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Pool II.\r\n\r\nThe pool inside the old Spanish fort.","caption_raw":"The Pool II.\r\n\r\nThe pool inside the old Spanish fort.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585799,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xr4f82a37f1af.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:17.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:17.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457583,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585796,"position":2,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:09.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Pool III.\r\n\r\nThe pool inside the old Spanish fort.","caption_raw":"The Pool III.\r\n\r\nThe pool inside the old Spanish fort.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585796,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xqw31bdc7ec9f.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:09.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:09.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457595,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585808,"position":3,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:37.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"27 I.\r\n\r\nIn the 27 triptych, six young men gather in another colonial-era building to celebrate a fictional birthday, complete with a cake and balloons. In the second photograph of the sequence, while five men cheer, one takes a snapshot of the festivities. The scene takes place in d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","caption_raw":"27 I.\r\n\r\nIn the 27 triptych, six young men gather in another colonial-era building to celebrate a fictional birthday, complete with a cake and balloons. In the second photograph of the sequence, while five men cheer, one takes a snapshot of the festivities. The scene takes place in d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585808,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xrof464f8adaa.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:37.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:37.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457594,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585807,"position":4,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:36.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"27 II.\r\n\r\nD\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.","caption_raw":"27 II.\r\n\r\nD\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585807,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xroa82d8d14ad.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:36.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:36.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457592,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585805,"position":5,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:30.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"27 III.\r\n\r\nD\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.","caption_raw":"27 III.\r\n\r\nD\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred local soldiers under Spanish occupation.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585805,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xri7d1b2c481b.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:30.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:30.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457593,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585806,"position":6,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:31.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Theater I. \r\n\r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby.","caption_raw":"The Theater I. \r\n\r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585806,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xri5b8cb3ed95.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:31.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:31.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457589,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585802,"position":7,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Theater II. \r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. \r\n\r\nAlthough I identify as decolonial in thinking and practice, I often ask myself an important question that post-partitioned states have been grappling with since the mid-twentieth century\u2019s independence movements: Are remnants of the colonial past, which today serve as Tarfaya\u2019s identity marker, worth preserving? I think although colonial-era architecture is the result of imperial violence, likening it to a wound, over time it becomes a scar tamed by the landscape, leading to a shift in both function and meaning. Scars that, I believe, are worthy of preservation as the colonial past remains an inescapable part of Morocco\u2019s cultural heritage.","caption_raw":"The Theater II. \r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. \r\n\r\nAlthough I identify as decolonial in thinking and practice, I often ask myself an important question that post-partitioned states have been grappling with since the mid-twentieth century\u2019s independence movements: Are remnants of the colonial past, which today serve as Tarfaya\u2019s identity marker, worth preserving? I think although colonial-era architecture is the result of imperial violence, likening it to a wound, over time it becomes a scar tamed by the landscape, leading to a shift in both function and meaning. Scars that, I believe, are worthy of preservation as the colonial past remains an inescapable part of Morocco\u2019s cultural heritage.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585802,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xrb4bc2433b49.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457590,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585803,"position":8,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"The Theater III.\r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. \r\n\r\nIn conversation with Sadat Shaibatat Merrebi Rebbu Ma al-\u2018Aynayn, a local resident and grandson of revolutionary leader Cheikh Mohamed Mustafa Ma al-\u2018Aynayn, I was told that one day everything on Tarfaya\u2019s coast would disappear and that artworks, much like Plato\u2019s writings on Atlantis, will remain as some of the last pieces of evidence for its existence.","caption_raw":"The Theater III.\r\n\r\nThe old theater, formerly called Cape Juby. \r\n\r\nIn conversation with Sadat Shaibatat Merrebi Rebbu Ma al-\u2018Aynayn, a local resident and grandson of revolutionary leader Cheikh Mohamed Mustafa Ma al-\u2018Aynayn, I was told that one day everything on Tarfaya\u2019s coast would disappear and that artworks, much like Plato\u2019s writings on Atlantis, will remain as some of the last pieces of evidence for its existence.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585803,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xrbdac6ff1af6.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:23.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457587,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585800,"position":9,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:21.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"By the yard I.\r\n\r\nA building inside the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Armed Forces.","caption_raw":"By the yard I.\r\n\r\nA building inside the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Armed Forces.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585800,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xr9a92b26a9fd.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:21.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:21.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457588,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585801,"position":10,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:22.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"In By the Yard II.\r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing in the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces (although not active) and avoided by local residents.","caption_raw":"In By the Yard II.\r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing in the old Spanish fort, now occupied by the Royal Moroccan Armed Forces (although not active) and avoided by local residents.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585801,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xr95f979f96e0.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:22.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:22.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457591,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585804,"position":11,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"By the yard III. \r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing around d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","caption_raw":"By the yard III. \r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing around d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585804,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xrg3542d02a94.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z"},"story_block":null},{"id":457584,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585797,"position":12,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:10.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"Armas Essalama.\r\n\r\nThe plan the city had in mind for economic growth was tourism. A ferry line, Armas Assalama, was opened in 2008. Back in the day, Armas Assalama, connecting Puerto Rosario to Tarfaya was supposedly what would make the city another door to Africa and bring thousands of tourists a year from the Canary Islands, also generating a bunch of work opportunities in Tarfaya besides the small port business. The ferry crashed after 4 months and 42 trips only. In a lifetime of 4 months, it had become a new attraction for the locals that did expect a lot from it.","caption_raw":"Armas Essalama.\r\n\r\nThe plan the city had in mind for economic growth was tourism. A ferry line, Armas Assalama, was opened in 2008. Back in the day, Armas Assalama, connecting Puerto Rosario to Tarfaya was supposedly what would make the city another door to Africa and bring thousands of tourists a year from the Canary Islands, also generating a bunch of work opportunities in Tarfaya besides the small port business. The ferry crashed after 4 months and 42 trips only. In a lifetime of 4 months, it had become a new attraction for the locals that did expect a lot from it.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585797,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xqxd544c4ce34.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:10.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:10.000000Z"},"story_block":null}],"cover_block_image":{"id":457591,"grant_submission_id":41681,"story_block_id":null,"image_id":585804,"position":11,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:45:21.000000Z","caption":"By the yard III. \r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing around d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","caption_raw":"By the yard III. \r\n\r\nYoung children are seen playing around d\u0101r al-mi\u2019a, or \u201chouse of one hundred,\u201d which, as the name suggests, formerly housed one hundred soldiers under Spanish occupation.","deleted_at":null,"image":{"id":585804,"filename":"\/users\/62495\/grant-submissions\/41681\/r69xrg3542d02a94.jpg","has_tried_to_detect_moderation_labels":0,"has_moderation_labels":0,"moderation_label_json":null,"is_explicit":0,"is_not_explicit":0,"explicit_percentage":0,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-01-25T16:28:28.000000Z"}},"user":{"id":62495,"firstname":"Imane","lastname":"Djamil","username":"imanedjamil","can_skip_grant_payment":0,"is_unsubscribed_from_grant_emails":0,"disabled_at":null,"gender":"female","has_agreed_to_newsletter":0,"has_agreed_to_newsletter_at":null,"timezone":null,"is_legacy":0,"is_collateral_juror":0,"legacy_id":null,"accepted_tandcs_may18_at":"2022-01-25 16:21:39","last_logged_in_at":"2022-02-17T21:43:07.000000Z","last_logged_in_country":"IT","registered_country":"MA","is_not_spam":0,"when_legacy_potd":null,"delete_at":null,"created_at":"2022-01-25T16:21:39.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-06-28T18:47:52.000000Z","deleted_at":null,"profile":{"id":62425,"user_id":62495,"born_in_id":null,"based_in_id":145485,"currently_in_id":null,"nationality_id":121,"avatar":"\/users\/62495\/avatars\/re7avr3d28b8d432.jpg","cover_image":null,"born_at":"1996-02-29T00:00:00.000000Z","profession":null,"bio":null,"long_bio":"<p>Imane Djamil (b.1996, in Casablanca, Morocco) is a Casablanca-based artist whose practice spans photography, storytelling, and creative-writing. Her work straddles a very fine line between reality and the sublime in what she calls \u2018mental geographies'. Her work, which is located at the crossroads of fine-art and documentary photography, explores places in \u2018post-traumatic transition,\u2019 where History engenders a metaphorical dialogue with personal and political anecdotes. \r<\/p><p>Djamil has participated in several residencies including Escales lie\u0301es at The French Pavililon of the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2018, Mujeres y el Mediterr\u00e1aneo in 2019 at the Casa Mediterraneo in Alicante, Spain in 2019, and most recently the the Summer\u2019s Lab at le Cube- Independent Art Room in Rabat, Morocco in 2020. Her work has been exhibited throughout Europe and Morocco, most notably as part of Le Maroc Contemporain at Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, France in 2014 and, En un instante, Marruecos at the Casa Arabe as part of PhotoESPA\u00d1A\u2019s official selection in 2018. In 2021, she was awarded the New Narratives in Environmental Photography prize by Fisheye magazine and La Gacilly photo festival for her work 80 Miles to Atlantis, and was among the European Union's All-Around Culture 4 year programme grantees for her project \"Cantara\". She co-founded KOZ collective with photographers M'hammed Kilito, Yasmine Hatimi and Seif Kousmate in 2020.<\/p>","long_bio_raw":"Imane Djamil (b.1996, in Casablanca, Morocco) is a Casablanca-based artist whose practice spans photography, storytelling, and creative-writing. Her work straddles a very fine line between reality and the sublime in what she calls \u2018mental geographies'. Her work, which is located at the crossroads of fine-art and documentary photography, explores places in \u2018post-traumatic transition,\u2019 where History engenders a metaphorical dialogue with personal and political anecdotes. \r\n \r\nDjamil has participated in several residencies including Escales lie\u0301es at The French Pavililon of the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2018, Mujeres y el Mediterr\u00e1aneo in 2019 at the Casa Mediterraneo in Alicante, Spain in 2019, and most recently the the Summer\u2019s Lab at le Cube- Independent Art Room in Rabat, Morocco in 2020. Her work has been exhibited throughout Europe and Morocco, most notably as part of Le Maroc Contemporain at Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris, France in 2014 and, En un instante, Marruecos at the Casa Arabe as part of PhotoESPA\u00d1A\u2019s official selection in 2018. In 2021, she was awarded the New Narratives in Environmental Photography prize by Fisheye magazine and La Gacilly photo festival for her work 80 Miles to Atlantis, and was among the European Union's All-Around Culture 4 year programme grantees for her project \"Cantara\". She co-founded KOZ collective with photographers M'hammed Kilito, Yasmine Hatimi and Seif Kousmate in 2020.","display_name":null,"website_url":"https:\/\/imanedjamil.com","profile_type_id":1,"show_age":1,"twitter_handle":null,"facebook_handle":null,"linkedin_handle":null,"skype_handle":null,"google_plus_handle":null,"pinterest_handle":null,"instagram_handle":"idjamil","vimeo_handle":null,"youtube_handle":null,"telephone":null,"company_name":null,"address_1":null,"address_2":null,"city":null,"region":null,"country":null,"postcode":null,"vat_id":null,"codice_fiscale":null,"codice_destinatario":null,"pec_destinatario":null,"show_explicit_content":"0","created_at":"2022-01-25T16:21:39.000000Z","updated_at":"2022-06-28T18:47:51.000000Z"}}}