Sword of Damocles

Filippo Venturi

2019

A population's identity and sense of belonging have long influenced and been influenced by the politics operating and governing in that country. History has taught us that the borders within which individuals conceive of themselves, recognise their own group and moderate their actions will periodically extend and contract in response to social changes, financial crises, anthropological phenomena and political ideals.

On 7 May 2019, Danish Prime Minister announced that a new general election would be held on 5 June, the day on which the country celebrates the anniversary of the Danish constitution.

Bursting in on this sequence of photographs of everyday life that depict the social situations, landscapes and references that outline the characteristic features of the Danish population are the campaign posters that infiltrated the city during the weeks prior to election day on 5 June 2019. However, these posters of political candidates were defaced by the population as a show of rejection, itself a build-up from the reaction to the election campaigns; a reaction whose beginning and end are becoming ever-more blurred. The precarious balance affecting modern-day society is best conveyed as a map dotted with different elements, actions and reactions, no longer arranged in a cause-and-effect relationship.

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  • Reproduction of a figurehead at the Nyholm military base. A figurehead is a wooden decoration, often depicting a female, that was fixed to the bow of ships from between the 16th and 19th centuries. Copenhagen, June 5, 2019.

  • A defaced campaign poster in detail. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • Housing complex called "The Mountain" (Bjerget in Danish), designed by the Bjarke Ingels Group, in Ørestad, one of the city's newest districts. Copenhagen, June 6, 2019.

  • Skaters, in the vicinity of the Nyholm military base. Copenhill (Amager Bakke in Danish) in the background, the city's modern-day incinerator. Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.

  • A defaced campaign poster in detail. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • Troops in formation near the Amaliemborg Royal Palace. Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.

  • Park near the Queen Louise's Bridge (Dronning Louises Bro in Danish). Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • A defaced campaign poster in detail. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • The University of IT (IT-Universitetet i København in Danish) is a public university and research institute. Copenhagen, June 6, 2019.

  • Troops in formation on a route from Rosenborg Castle, across the city towards the Amaliemborg Royal Palace, where the changing of the guards takes place. Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.

  • A defaced campaign poster in detail. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • Copenhagen City Hall (Københavns Rådhus in Danish), seat of the local government, in Neo-Renaissance style. It was used as the polling station for the general elections on 5 June 2019. Copenhagen, June 5, 2019.

  • Superkilen, public park in the Nørrebro district. Designed by the artist group Superflex
    in collaboration with the Bjarke Ingels Group and Topotek1. The park was officially inaugurated in June 2012. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • A defaced campaign poster in detail. Copenhagen, June 6, 2019.

  • Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, the museum which holds a private collection founded by Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914), Carlsberg beer brewer (taking over from his father and founder, Jacob Christian Jacobsen). Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.

  • Campaign posters at the Nørreport underground station. Copenhagen, June 4, 2019.

  • Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, the museum which holds a private collection founded by Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914), Carlsberg beer brewer (taking over from his father and founder, Jacob Christian Jacobsen). Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.

  • Rosenborg Castle (Rosenborg Slot in Danish), from the Renaissance era, located in the city centre. Former royal residence, now home to the Danish Royal Collection Museum (Danske Kongers Kronologiske Samling in Danish). Copenhagen, June 12, 2019.

  • Bust in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, the museum which holds a private
    collection founded by Carl Jacobsen (1842-1914), Carlsberg beer brewer (taking over from his father and founder, Jacob Christian Jacobsen). Copenhagen, June 7, 2019.


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