4917 deaths - PhMuseum

4917 deaths

Agata Awruk

2016 - Ongoing

Podlasie, Poland

In 4917 deaths Agata Awruk comes back to her hometown (Ogrodniczki - Polish eastern nowhere) to take care of her mother which has cancer little by little spreading all over the body. Each time her mother has a breakdown counts as one death. Agata has counted already 4917. The story is a person evolution in cancer surroundings and cancer evolution in human surroundings.

For this ongoing project, Agata photographs her mother in all aspect and environment. Hospital, family, home, just regular daylife situation but this indication of a specific time and place is unnecessary, as it is hardly referenced in the exposition. Timelessness and placelessness show us the quality of these photographs. We can see the abstract nature of even quite specific images. Famous Heraclitus’ aphorism “Everything flows, everything changes” most accurately represents the essence of the reality shown at the photographs.

The relentless flow of life was stopped and fixed with the help of the photographic process. It can be said, that the photographs included in the project are self-reflective. They show us that process of fixing the fragments of real world in photographic images, where the flow of vital juices congeals on glass and skin, in hair and grass, inside veins and medical tubes. That process of freezing the reality with the help of photography is depicted here with the image of a thin layer of ice framed by the walls of an empty pool.

Agata Awruk’s photography refers us to the trend of snapshot aesthetic, which mimics the manner of taking random, banal photographs in a hurry. Such aesthetic arose against the fatigue from staged and overdone photos with thoughtful composition. They most subtly reflect the surface of the fabric of the reality, in its everyday life and hidden timeless truths. And today the snapshot aesthetics received a powerful impetus for development in connection with the emergence of social networks.

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